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Fall Classes 2014

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 ART & ARCHITECTURE

F1406 Embodying Holiness:  A Brief History of Icons
Presenter: Michael Kapetan
Dates: Thursdays, September 11, 18, and 25 
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $24;  Nonmembers $35

Description:  From its earliest days, the Christian faith has employed images (eikona in Greek) to share Christianity’s stories among a largely illiterate populace.  In the Eastern Orthodox denominations of Christianity, these humble pictures have evolved into holy icons.  They are woven into the very fabric of worship.  They are received not simply as pictures of holy people, but as the actual embodiment of holiness itself.  These icons bring the faithful into direct contact with the community of saints.  In this class, with the expert guidance of artist Michael Kapetan, we will examine the extraordinary circumstances that led to this transformation of an art form into a form of spiritual reality. 

Michael Kapetan is a sculptor who works primarily in wood, but in metal and stone as well.  He has been a liturgical artist for more than 35 years, creating art for Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox churches, and for synagogues.  In the Ann Arbor area, his work can be seen in the St. Joseph Hospital Chapel, the St. Joseph Catholic Church (Dexter), the First Presbyterian Church, St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, and Temple Beth Israel.  Mike is nationally recognized for his liturgical images, and for his abstract and solar sculptures.  He holds a degree in art history from Harvard University, and a Master’s degree in sculpture from the University of Michigan.

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F1420 Mediterranean Gems Venice and Malta: Magnets for Traders and Travelers
Presenter: Gerlinda Melchiori
Dates: Fridays, November 7 and 14
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $16;  Nonmembers $25

Description:   For centuries, people from countries surrounding the Mediterranean Sea easily navigated between Asia, Europe, and Africa.  The trade exchanges and the search for natural resources eventually led to the cultural exchange of ideas, sciences, ideologies, faiths, mythologies, art, and lifestyles.  The Republics of Venice and Malta are excellent examples of the rise and fall of several trading empires, and of the culture they disseminated across this historically intense geo-political terrain.  Although no longer super powers today, these two Mediterranean gems have become magnets for historians, travelers, and art connoisseurs.

November 7
Beautiful, Romantic Venice:  A Gondola Ride on the Grand Canal
Considered by many to be one of the most beautiful cities in the world, the Venetian lagoon, and its hinterland, the Veneto region, offer a spectacular experience.  We will first travel back through the fascinating and tumultuous history of the Venetian trading empire, and its famous artists and oligarchs.  Then we will take a gondola ride through the “Most Serene Republic.”  We will glide under bridges, past opulent palaces and basilicas, view villas once occupied by Vivaldi, Wagner, and Titian, and finally pass by boutiques of masks and Murano glass.  We will also stop along the way to visit several other famous sites such as the Jewish Ghetto.

November 14
Malta:  A History of Conquest, Culture, and Intrigue

Following a short history of the island, we will discover the treasures of the ancient capital of Mdina (briefly visited by Saint Paul), and Malta’s present-day capital, Valletta.  Founded by Grand Master Valletta of the Maltese Order, the city of Valletta displays massive city walls and strategic defense positions, which in 1565 were significant in preventing the expansion of the Ottoman Empire into Europe.  We will visit baroque churches, spectacular palaces, and view vast art collections (including a famous Caravaggio) of the Grand Masters of the Holy Order of Saint John.  Finally, we will wander around the archipelago’s beautiful beaches, caves, and archaeological sites.

Gerlinda Melchiori has enjoyed contributing to Elderwise for several years.  After earning two degrees in European history and business, she received her doctorate in higher education management from the University of Michigan, where she later enjoyed a rewarding career in research administration.  Now retired, Gerlinda has served the last 15 years as a management consultant to universities in Europe, Central and East Asia, the Middle East, and Africa.  Her presentations reflect her special knowledge of history, aesthetics and the arts, business, and education.  Gerlinda welcomes class participation and encourages questions and discussion.

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F1425 Drawing Dimensions:  How Artists Treat Space
Presenter: Boyd Chapin
Date: Friday, September 19
Time: 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   Attorney, artist, art institute volunteer, and Detroit native Boyd Chapin returns to Elderwise with this fascinating discussion of the history of the artistic use of space.  Our discussion will include, but certainly will not be limited to, how artists have rendered multi-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface, from ancient through modern times.  We will explore variations in the treatment of space in ancient and classical Greek art, as well as Medieval, Renaissance, and modern art.  We will also address the questions of how and why our perception of space has changed over time. 

Boyd Chapin is a graduate of Wayne State University and a senior attorney with the Detroit firm of Garan Lucow Miller, PC.  Boyd shares his passion for all forms of art through his own work in pencil, oil, and acrylic, and through his role as a docent with the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA).  His presentation on artistic space is a direct outcome of his personal interests and his volunteer activity at the DIA.

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F1440 Dictators and Their Architecture:  Brief Glimpses of Modernism
Presenter: Kingsbury Marzolf
Date: Wednesday, November 5 
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   In this class we will travel back to the early 20th century and the rise of authoritarian regimes in Europe.  We will explore why some architectural styles survived the years of dictatorship, and why some did not.  Following the Russian Bolshevik Revolution in the late 1910s, and the Fascist takeover in Italy in the early 1920s, each of these countries had, for a time, a modern architecture paralleling that found in democratic European nations.  In Russia and Italy, however, opposition within the leadership eventually returned most of the public architecture to a more familiar and conservative use of historic styles.  By contrast, from the 1930s in Nazi Germany, a form of modernized classicism developed.  This style was more restrained than the radical design found in Russia and Italy, and it survived until the end of the Nazi regime.  This illustrated lecture will examine these phenomena and will introduce the architects who produced them. 

Kingsbury Marzolf is an architect and a native of Chicago.  He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Michigan where he joined the architecture faculty in 1963.  Kingsbury taught the history of architecture and urban development at the University and in Europe for more than 50 years.  Retired in 1999, he is now Professor Emeritus of Architecture at the University of Michigan.

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F1451 Tour of Pewabic Pottery of Detroit:  The Fabrication Studio, Tile Showroom, and Gallery of Studio Artists
Presenters/Guides: Pewabic Pottery Docent Staff
Date: Thursday, September 4
Time: 2:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee: Members $13;  Nonmembers $20  [Fee includes a $5 charge for the tour.]

Description:   Founded in 1903, Pewabic Pottery is a studio and school of tilework known for incandescent glazes.  The founding partners, Mary Chase Perry Stratton (the artist) and Horace James Caulkins (the high-heat kiln specialist), provided a unique and collaborative contribution to the International Arts and Crafts movement of the early 20th century.  Their work exemplified the American Craftsman Style.  The word “pewabic” derives from the Ojibwa (Chippewa) word for the color of the copper and the copper clay of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.  Pewabic Pottery of Detroit was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1991. 

This tour, led by Pewabic docents, includes an exhibit on the life of Mary Chase Perry Stratton and some museum pieces from the early years of the school.  You will also have the opportunity to observe artisans creating wares and tiles in the Fabrication Studio, several custom projects on display in the Tile Showroom, and an array of the finest among contemporary ceramic work in the Gallery of Studio Artists.  Driving directions and parking instructions will be sent with your registration confirmation.

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F1453 A Tour of the University of Michigan North Campus Sculpture
Presenter/Guide: Ina Sandalow
Date: Thursday, October 2
Time: 1:00 to 2:30 p.m.  [Please note the 2:30 p.m. end time.]
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   This walking tour of the University of Michigan North Campus will introduce participants to world-class examples of contemporary monumental outdoor sculpture as produced by some of the leading artists of our time.  Many famous modern sculptors have contributed to the North Campus collection.  Among them are Maya Lin, Kenneth Snelson, Alexander Liberman, and Gerome Kamrowski.  These are but a sampling of the extraordinary array of artists and works of art included in this tour.  Participants will gather at the Lurie Bell Tower on North Campus and should be prepared to walk approximately a half mile.  Driving directions and parking information will be sent with your registration confirmation. 

Ina Sandalow previously taught history and law at Ann Arbor’s Pioneer High School.  She has been a docent with the University of Michigan Museum of Art for more than 15 years.  The North Campus sculpture tour is one of her favorite projects.

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F1455 The Collectors:  Tour of the University of Michigan Museum of Art
Presenter/Guide:  Diane Rado
Date: Thursday, October 9 at the University of Michigan Museum of Art
Time: 1:00 to 2:30 p.m.  [Please note the 2:30 p.m. end time.]
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   The many different personalities who donated their collections to the University of Michigan Museum of Art (UMMA) helped to create a museum collection that is both high in quality and uniquely diverse.  These donors were people who loved art, who felt that art enhanced their lives, and who believed that collecting art made life more interesting.  During the later years of their lives, they wanted to pass those pleasures on by donating their collected art works to a museum, making them accessible to everyone, free of charge.  This UMMA tour will focus on some of those personalities, and on the art they loved.  We will learn about former Monuments Man Charles Sawyer, previously a distinguished director of UMMA, and successful businessman Henry Clay Lewis from Coldwater, Michigan, who opened the first art museum in the Midwest in 1869.  We will also engage with Maude Von Ketteler, an adventurous debutante from Grosse Pointe who married a German diplomat and became involved in the Chinese Boxer Rebellion (circa 1900), and with Margaret Watson Parker, a close friend of Charles Freer, of Freer Gallery fame.  For this tour, driving directions and parking instructions will be sent with your registration confirmation

Diane Rado received her bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees from the University of Michigan.  She has been a docent and tour guide at UMMA for 15 years, and says of her vocation, “We docents are always learning more and more from our
curators and classes, from distinguished scholars in art history, and from the people who visit us!”

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FILM and VIDEO Back to top

F1407 Books into Movies:  A Tricky Transformation - John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath
Presenter: Cecilia Donohue
Dates: Fridays, September 19 and 26 
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon  [Please note the September 26 session may run past noon, to accommodate the length of the film.]
Fee: Members $16;  Nonmembers $25

Recommended Text: The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck.  Reissued 2006.
                                                Penguin Classics.  ISBN number 978-0143039433.
                                                Approximate price:  $10.  Also available as an e-book.

Description:   To commemorate the 75th anniversary of its publication, John Steinbeck’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath will be the focus of this semester’s edition of the Books into Movies series.  We will discuss the novel during the first week of the class, with special attention to its lasting relevance.  In week two, we will view the highly acclaimed 1940 film adaptation of The Grapes of Wrath, directed by John Ford and starring Henry Fonda and Jane Darwell.  It is strongly recommended that students read the novel before the first class meeting.

Cecilia Donohue is a retired professor and chair of Language and Literature at Madonna University. She is the author of Robert Penn Warrens Novels:  Feminine and Feminist Discourse and the editor of an anthology of essays on Sandra Cisneros’s Woman Hollering Creek. Cecilia currently serves on the Editorial Board of the Steinbeck Review.

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F1411 The Dawn of Movie Musicals
Presenter: Henry Aldridge

Dates: Fridays, October 3 and 10 
Time: 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.  [Please note the 4:00 p.m. end time.]
Fee: Members $16;  Nonmembers $25

Description:   Musicals are among the most popular and enduring of movie genres.  During the first session of this course, class members will explore the evolution of the “backstage musical,” and will watch Busby Berkeley’s 42nd Street, produced in l933.  In the second session, we will consider the “integrated musical,” with special emphasis on the work of song-and-dance partners Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers.  During this session we will enjoy watching the film Shall We Dance, released in l937. 

Henry Aldridge is Professor Emeritus of Film Studies at Eastern Michigan University, and is a popular Elderwise lecturer.  He holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from the University of North Carolina and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.  Dr. Aldridge is widely published on the subject of American movies, and has recently written a book about Ann Arbor’s Michigan Theater, where he has served as a volunteer for many years.

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F1415 The Films of Ingmar Bergman: The Seventh Seal and Wild Strawberries
Presenter: Ira Konigsberg
Dates: Tuesday, October 21, and Wednesday, October 29
Time: I:00 to 4:00 p.m.  [Please note the 4:00 p.m. end time.]
Fee: Members $16;  Nonmembers $25

Description:   Ingmar Bergman was unique among 20th century filmmakersin the depth of his psychological portrayals, the relevance of his insights, and the artistry of his film technique.  To quote Woody Allen, Ingmar Bergman was “ . . . probably the greatest film artist, all things considered, since the invention of the motion picture camera.”  We will screen, and then discuss, the two films that brought Bergman international fame and set himoff on his remarkable career.

Tuesday, October 21                   The Seventh Seal (1957)

Wednesday, October 29              Wild Strawberries (1957)

Ira Konigsberg is Professor Emeritus of Film and English at the University of Michigan.  From 1988 to 1995, he directed and developed the University’s Program in Film and Video Studies.  His books include the Complete Film Dictionary, which was the standard work of its kind in both film studies and the film industry for many years.

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F1417 Heroism in Film
Presenter: Susan Nenadic
Dates: Fridays, October 31 and November 7, 14, and 21 
Time: 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.  [Please note the 4:00 p.m. end time.]
Fee: Members $32;  Nonmembers $45

Description:   Every story has a protagonist.  But does every story have a hero?  Can there be more than one hero, even if they represent opposite sides of an issue?  For this class, we will view four films:  Geronimo: An American Legend, The Lives of Others, The Help, and The First Grader.  All are powerful dramas and are set around the world.  The Lives of Others takes place in East Germany just prior to The Wall coming down, and The First Grader centers on an 84 year-old man in Kenya who wants to learn how to read.  All four films provide class participants with an opportunity to discuss not only the definition of heroism, but quality in film making, the responsibility of film makers when producing historical films, and, in the case of The Help, how accurately a film presents the original written novel.                                                       

October 31  Geronimo: An American Legend, Columbia Pictures, 1993

November 7 The Lives of Others, Wiedermann & Berg, 2006 

November 14 The Help, Touchstone Pictures, 2011

November 21 The First Grader, BBC Films, 2010

Susan Nenadic retired in 2004 from a rewarding career of teaching English and history.  She is the author of A Purse of Her Own, a recent study of 19th century women.  Susan is a former director of the Washtenaw County Historical Society, and is currently an active member the American Association of University Women. She presents programs throughout Michigan.

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F1418 William Faulkner:  As I Lay Dying
Presenter: Kevin Eyster
Dates: Wednesdays, November 5 and 12 
Time: 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.  [Please note there is a 4:00 p.m. end time for November 12.]
Fee: Members $16;  Nonmembers $25

Description:   Published in 1930 and adapted to film by Millennium Entertainment in 2013, As I Lay Dying is William Faulkner’s fifth novel.  Consisting of 59 narratives or monologues and constructed from the individual viewpoints of 15 character-narrators, the novel centers on the Bundren family’s saga and journey to bury the family matriarch, Addie.  Our first class session will focus on the novel, and we will view the film adaptation during the second session.  A Vintage Books paperback edition of the novel (ISBN 0679736514) is available at your local libraries and bookstores.  New and used copies are also available at a reasonable price through several online book dealers.  

Kevin Eyster is a professor and Chair of the Department of Language and Literature at Madonna University.  He teaches courses in critical writing and literary analysis, American folklore and literature, African American literature, and a Special Topics offering on the fiction of William Faulkner and Toni Morrison.

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HISTORY, CULTURE & RELIGION Back to top

F1405  Chinese Religions and Philosophies
Presenter: Jiu-Hwa Upshur
Dates: Wednesdays, September 10, 17, and 24
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $24;  Nonmembers $35

Description:   This course will look at Chinese religious beliefs and philosophies as they evolved from antiquity to the present.  Ancient Chinese worshipped many gods and natural forces.  Between the 5th and 3rd centuries B.C., just as in classical Greece, many philosophies flourished in China, the most significant being Confucianism and Taoism, which remain important in Chinese thought today.  Foreign religions began to enter China around 2,000 years ago, as a result of the flourishing Eurasian trade along the Silk Road.  Among those foreign religions, Buddhism alone would flourish to become one of the three dominant belief systems in China, along with Confucianism and Taoism.  Christianity was introduced into China at several points throughout the nation’s history, and has become culturally important, as has Islam, which mainly prevails among people of Turkic ethnicity living in the northwest.  Our course will conclude with an examination of religious issues in present-day China, especially among Tibetan Buddhists, Turkic Muslims, and Christians. 

Jiu-Hwa Upshur received her B.A. degree from the University of Sydney and her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in history from the University of Michigan, where she specialized in modern Chinese history.  Jiu-Hwa retired from the Department of History at Eastern Michigan University in 2007.

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F1413  A Celebration of Doo Wop:  Vocal Group Harmony, 1954-1963
Presenter: Michael Homel
Dates: Wednesdays, October 8, 15, and 22 
Time: 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee: Members $24;  Nonmembers $35

Description:   As frequent PBS fundraising specials and Aaron Neville’s CD My True Story attest, doo wop still evokes sweet memories among baby boomers.  For a decade, starting in the mid 1950s, young urban males expressed their romantic yearnings, exuberance, sorrows, and fears through complex vocal arrangements.  With falsetto swoops, bass backgrounds, and spectacular endings, inner-city youth showed off their talents as they vied for the affections of the girls of their dreams.  This three-session course develops the social context of this distinctive music, touches on forerunners (Mills Brothers, Ink Spots), then explores the performers, the songs, and their themes.  We invite all “earth angels” to “the island of love” for “a story untold” about doo wop’s complexion, its use of classic American popular song, and its influence on 1960s popular music. 

Michael Homel is Professor Emeritus of History at Eastern Michigan University.  Mike specializes in 20th century U.S. history and U.S. urban history.  He is the author of Down from Equality: Black Chicagoans and the Public Schools, and Unlocking City Hall: Exploring the History of Local Government and Politics, and other publications on urban politics and education.

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F1420 Mediterranean Gems Venice and Malta: Magnets for Traders and Travelers
Presenter: Gerlinda Melchiori
Dates: Fridays, November 7 and 14
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $16;  Nonmembers $25

Description:   For centuries, people from countries surrounding the Mediterranean Sea easily navigated between Asia, Europe, and Africa.  The trade exchanges and the search for natural resources eventually led to the cultural exchange of ideas, sciences, ideologies, faiths, mythologies, art, and lifestyles.  The Republics of Venice and Malta are excellent examples of the rise and fall of several trading empires, and of the culture they disseminated across this historically intense geo-political terrain.  Although no longer super powers today, these two Mediterranean gems have become magnets for historians, travelers, and art connoisseurs.

November 7   Beautiful, Romantic Venice:  A Gondola Ride on the Grand Canal
Considered by many to be one of the most beautiful cities in the world, the Venetian lagoon, and its hinterland, the Veneto region, offer a spectacular experience.  We will first travel back through the fascinating and tumultuous history of the Venetian trading empire, and its famous artists and oligarchs.  Then we will take a gondola ride through the “Most Serene Republic.”  We will glide under bridges, past opulent palaces and basilicas, view villas once occupied by Vivaldi, Wagner, and Titian, and finally pass by boutiques of masks and Murano glass.  We will also stop along the way to visit several other famous sites such as the Jewish Ghetto.

November 14 Malta:  A History of Conquest, Culture, and Intrigue
Following a short history of the island, we will discover the treasures of the ancient capital of Mdina (briefly visited by Saint Paul), and Malta’s present-day capital, Valletta.  Founded by Grand Master Valletta of the Maltese Order, the city of Valletta displays massive city walls and strategic defense positions, which in 1565 were significant in preventing the expansion of the Ottoman Empire into Europe.  We will visit baroque churches, spectacular palaces, and view vast art collections (including a famous Caravaggio) of the Grand Masters of the Holy Order of Saint John.  Finally, we will wander around the archipelago’s beautiful beaches, caves, and archaeological sites.

Gerlinda Melchiori has enjoyed contributing to Elderwise for several years.  After earning two degrees in European history and business, she received her doctorate in higher education management from the University of Michigan, where she later enjoyed a rewarding career in research administration.  Now retired, Gerlinda has served the last 15 years as a management consultant to universities in Europe, Central and East Asia, the Middle East, and Africa.  Her presentations reflect her special knowledge of history, aesthetics and the arts, business, and education.  Gerlinda welcomes class participation and encourages questions and discussion.

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F1421 A History of the Game of Football
Presenter: Erik Pedersen
Date: Thursday, September 4 
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   Did you know that during the 1890s, a United States President threatened to ban the game of football because it was so violent?  Did you know that in 1928, a Michigan Normal College football team almost beat the University of Michigan?  Can you identify the football team that won 56 straight games and scored 2,831 points while allowing only 40 points to the opposition?  And, did you know that the concept for the zebra-striped shirts for official referees evolved during a University of Michigan and Southern California football game?  In this class, through stories, artifacts, and memorabilia, we will discuss the background to these questions, as well as the facts of how the game of football evolved. 

Erik Pedersen is Professor Emeritus of the Health Promotion and Human Performance Department at Eastern Michigan University, where he taught for 38 years.  One of his major areas of interest is the history of physical education and sport.  Erik obtained his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Eastern Illinois University and his degree in physical education (P.E.D.) from Indiana University.

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F1428 The Lexington-Concord Battle Road:  Birthplace of the American Revolution
Presenter: Judy Williston
Date: Wednesday, October 1
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   In April 2013 and 2014, Judy Williston attended a celebration of the Patriots in Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts.  One of Judy’s great-great-grandfathers was a Minuteman from Concord.  Judy and her friend were there to put their “boots on the ground” to honor their patriot ancestors and to celebrate “the first shot.”  They had an opportunity to stand on the very bridge the British Redcoats wanted to cross to find and obtain the ammunition hidden at Concord.  In this class, Judy will share with us her special experiences at the Patriot celebration, and the different re-enactments along the original battle trail, now known as the Bloody Battle Road, as well as in the woods and fields of Minutemen National Historical Park.  Judy will also describe the magic of joining others from the Lexington chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), along with the Minutemen, to place a wreath at the onument honoring the first eight men to lose their lives in 1775. 

Judy Williston is an emeritus professor with the Department of Teacher Education at Eastern Michigan University.  She received her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan and taught high school and university classes for more than 40 years.  One of Judy’s special interests is genealogy and the history she uncovers through her research.  She is a member of the Michigan DAR and a Regent of the Sarah Caswell Angell chapter in Ann Arbor.

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F1433 Remember Station Wagons?  Most Of Us Drove One!
Presenter: Steve Stanford
Date: Tuesday, October 14
Time: 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   Join us in this class to discover the origins of the American station wagon, and how it became a cultural icon after World War II.  Learn how the station wagon grew in popularity to serve families everywhere, until it met its demise with the appearance of the ubiquitous minivan.  In this presentation we will also hear about a counter culture of eccentric car collectors who are attempting to keep the station wagon alive today.  Ford historian Steve Stanford returns to Elderwise with this nostalgic, insightful, and fun look at the station wagon through the use of film, photographs, and advertising art.  He promises he will talk about more than just Ford station wagons (!), and will pay homage to other models as well. 

Steve Stanford is a retired Oakland County Project Manager.  He has previously offered numerous resentations on Ford-related subjects for Elderwise.  He is a participant in the Henry Ford 150 project, celebrating Henry’s 150th birthday (2013), and he is also a member of the Henry Ford Heritage Association and the Society of Automotive Historians.

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F1435 Stories in Stone:  A Walk in the Cemetery
Presenter: Rochelle Balkam
Date:  Monday, October 27 at the Red Cross Building
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   In this illustrated lecture, Rochelle Balkam will demonstrate the historical importance of our local cemeteries.  There is no single site in a community that tells its story with more drama than the cemetery.  It is the one place where we can trace our “roots” in what is becoming a “rootless” society.  Each gravestone has a story to tell.  Pioneers and the rich and famous lie side by side with the poor and the not so famous.  Scoundrels and saints are there, along with infants and centenarians.  As we travel from Alaska to Key West, from Hawaii to Canada, from New Zealand to England, gravestones reveal examples of a myriad of burial customs and symbolism.  Through classes and workshops like this one, we hope to encourage communities to focus on one of their most significant societal and historical resources – the local cemetery. 

Rochelle Balkam has taught Michigan history at Eastern Michigan University (EMU) for 23 years.  She holds an M.A. degree in history and an M.S. in historic preservation from EMU, and is Chair of the Friends of the Townhall School on the EMU campus.  Rochelle serves on the board of the Michigan One-Room Schoolhouse Association, and is a former board member of the Historical Society of Michigan.

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F1436  Introduction to Chinese Education, Then and Now
Presenter: Amy Seetoo
Date: Wednesday, October 29
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   This class provides a general survey of historical and cultural issues concerning education in China.  Beginning with the philosopher Confucius (551-479 B.C.), also known as the Great Teacher, we will follow the course of education in China through the 7th century A.D., with the establishment and perpetuation of the imperial civil service examinations, to the American influences on modern Chinese education in the 19th and 20th centuries.  We will also have an opportunity to compare the current educational systems in the People’s Republic of China and the Republic of China on Taiwan. 

Amy Seetoo arrived in the United States in 1968.  She holds master’s degrees from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (teaching English as a second language), Northern Illinois University (library science), and the University of Michigan (business administration).  Amy co-founded the Chinese American Society of Ann Arbor and the Healthy Asian Americans Project at the University of Michigan.  She has served as cultural consultant, interpreter, and language instructor, and is dedicated to promoting cultural exchange.

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F1439  Henry Ford:  Aviator
Presenter: Steve Stanford
Date: Tuesday, November 4
Time: 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   It is not widely known that Henry Ford was a pioneer in early aviation.  Beyond his wartime involvement in producing bombers at the Willow Run plant, Ford was an early supporter of personal aircraft, as well as air transportation for both freight and passenger service.  Henry built an airport in Dearborn, complete with a factory to produce an airplane with his name on it – the Ford Tri-Motor.  He also built one of the first airport hotels, the Dearborn Inn.  Ford historian, Steve Stanford, will detail this fascinating aspect of aviation history with many photographs and a film. 

Steve Stanford is a retired Oakland County Project Manager.  He has previously offered numerous presentations on Ford-related subjects for Elderwise.  Steve is a participant in the Henry Ford 150 project, celebrating Henry’s 150th birthday (2013).  He is also a member of the Henry Ford Heritage Association and the Society of Automotive Historians.

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F1441 America’s Engagement in the Great War
Presenter: Roger Crownover
Date: Monday, November 10
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   This Fall marks the 100th anniversary of the onset of World War I.  Following upon the assassination of Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand by a Yugoslav nationalist, the Great War began on July 28, 1914, with shots fired by the Austro-Hungarians as they prepared for their invasion of Serbia.  In recognition of the centennial of this unprecedented global conflict, we will examine America’s involvement through a discussion of these and other important questions:  What did America look like before the war?  What was the nation’s reaction to the prospect of war?  How was the war engaged?  What did America and the world look like after the war? 

Roger Crownover holds a Ph.D. degree in military history and is Chair of the Department of History at Madonna University.  He is the author of The United States Intervention in North Russia – 1918, 1919:  The Polar Bear Odyssey, and served as the consulting historian for the 2009 PBS documentary on World War I, Voices of a Never Ending Dawn.

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F1442 A History of the Dulcimers—Hammered and Mountain
Presenters: Sandi and Bob Hlavacek, and David Smith
Date: Monday, November 10
Time: 1:00 to 3:30 p.m.  [Please note the 3:30 p.m. end time.]
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   Come and explore the history and music of the dulcimers – those charming instruments people seldom see or hear, but find fascinating when they do.  As acoustic instruments become overrun by electronics in current musical trends, it is good to revive some of the instruments that once created the music we learned to love, with melody, harmony, and lyrics we can understand without blushing.  The Hammered Dulcimer predates the Bible, and the Mountain/Lap Dulcimer comes from the Scottish settlers of the Appalachian Mountains in North America.  As we learn about the background of these unique instruments, we will also enjoy a hands-on opportunity to play a dulcimer and experience a whole new world of musical fun. 

Sandi and Bob Hlavacek have lived and worked in Southeast Michigan for more than 40 years.  They discovered the dulcimer 12 years ago, and thus began their unexpected musical adventure in retirement.  The Hlavaceks have performed at Hill Auditorium and Greenfield Village, for naturalization ceremonies, and at retirement and nursing homes.  Both Sandi and Bob overcame challenges to learning to play the dulcimer, and are convinced that almost anyone can learn to play an instrument.  The process is a great brain-builder. 

David Smith is the Hlavaceks’ friend and co-performer with the Silver Strings Dulcimer Society.  Dave’s “hobby” is building musical instruments.  Mountain and Hammered dulcimers are among the 50 assorted instruments, many with unique designs, which Dave has built over the past 38 years.

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 F1444 Introduction to Chinese Health Care, Past and Present
Presenter: Amy Seetoo
Date: Wednesday, November 12
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   By way of the historical record and a cultural approach, Amy Seetoo offers a survey of health issues and health care delivery in China.  From the earliest origins of herbal medicine through the evolution of health beliefs and health practices, to the present day systems, we will explore the centuries-long traditions of Chinese medicine.  We will have an opportunity to compare the current health system in the People’s Republic of China with the national health system of the Republic of China on Taiwan, a system that was established in 1995. 

Amy Seetoo arrived in the United States in 1968.  She holds master’s degrees from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (teaching English as a second language), Northern Illinois University (library science), and the University of Michigan (business administration).  Amy co-founded the Chinese American Society of Ann Arbor and the Healthy Asian Americans Project at the University of Michigan.  She has served as cultural consultant, interpreter, and language instructor, and is dedicated to promoting cultural exchange.

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F1447 Russia’s Greatest Cities:  Moscow and St. Petersburg
Presenters: Nina Dmitrieva and Fred Mayer
Date: Wednesday, November 19
Time: 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   Russia's two greatest cities, Moscow and St. Petersburg, have dramatically different physical environments.  The history, city planning, and architecture of each present clear contrasts to the other.  In this class we will compare these two great cities, and explore the general pattern which characterizes each one.  We will then focus more specifically on several individual buildings which are representative of each. 

For this class our presenters are a wife-and-husband team, Nina Dmitrieva and Fred Mayer.  Nina was born and raised in Moscow, where her father was a practicing architect.  In 1999, Nina moved to the United States where she taught at the University of Michigan and Washtenaw Community College.  Fred is a retired urban planner who studied architecture and architectural history at Pratt Institute in New York City, and at Cornell University.  He joined the University of Michigan campus planning staff in 1968, and served as University Planner until his retirement in 2003.

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HOBBIES & SPORTS Back to top

F1403 Creative Writing
Presenter: Jane Bridges
Dates: Mondays, September 8, October 6, November 3, and November 24
Time: 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.  [Please note the 4:00 p.m. end time.]
Fee: Members $32;  Nonmembers $45
Class Size: Enrollment for this class is limited to 12 attendees.

Description:   For those seeking a gentle introduction to putting pen to paper, Jane Bridges, retired schoolteacher and published poet, offers a relaxing atmosphere in which to explore your ambitions.  Whether you are seeking simply to jot down memories, write a short history of past events, or possibly even venture into the realm of published writing, this class is for you.  No textbooks, no lectures, and no PowerPoint – just pen, paper, and plenty of down-home supportive chatter.  With a class size limited to 12 eager learners, you will never feel overwhelmed or overlooked, and you will meet new friends whose company you will enjoy
the entire term. 

Jane Bridges grew up in Texas and New Hampshire, and in India.  She has lived in Ann Arbor for more than 50 years, and has taught writing in both public and private schools.  Jane’s poems have been published, or accepted for publication, in the journals Margie, Sow’s Ear Poetry Review, Third Wednesday, and The MacGuffin.  In retirement, Jane draws on her experiences to guide others with their writing skills, style, and projects.

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F1421 A History of the Game of Football
Presenter: Erik Pedersen
Date: Thursday, September 4 
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   Did you know that during the 1890s, a United States President threatened to ban the game of football because it was so violent?  Did you know that in 1928, a Michigan Normal College football team almost beat the University of Michigan?  Can you identify the football team that won 56 straight games and scored 2,831 points while allowing only 40 points to the opposition?  And, did you know that the concept for the zebra-striped shirts for official referees evolved during a University of Michigan and Southern California football game?  In this class, through stories, artifacts, and memorabilia, we will discuss the background to these questions, as well as the facts of how the game of football evolved. 

Erik Pedersen is Professor Emeritus of the Health Promotion and Human Performance Department at Eastern Michigan University, where he taught for 38 years.  One of his major areas of interest is the history of physical education and sport.  Erik obtained his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Eastern Illinois University and his degree in physical education (P.E.D.) from Indiana University.

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F1422 Battle for the Little Brown Jug: The Michigan Minnesota Football Rivalry
Presenter: Ken Magee
Date: Monday, September 15
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   If you think the Ohio State-Michigan football game is big, wait until you hear the history of the rivalry between the University of Michigan and the University of Minnesota.  In 1903, when the Michigan Wolverines arrived in Minneapolis to battle the Minnesota Golden Gophers, a simple thirty-cent, five-gallon Red Wing stoneware pottery water jug became the prize for college football’s first “trophy game.”  Over the years, the Little Brown Jug has been the subject of conspiracy theories, theft, national championships, and most of all, college pride, with each game’s victor prominently displaying the Jug on its campus until the next Michigan-Minnesota football contest. 

Ken Magee was born and raised in Ann Arbor.  He is an expert in Wolverine football history.  Ken has the largest collection of vintage Michigan football memorabilia in the world, from which he has loaned many Wolverine artifacts to the University of Michigan Football Museum at Schembechler Hall.  The owner of the Ann Arbor Sports Memorabilia Shop, Ken recently published a book
on the history of the Little Brown Jug
.

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F1426 Writing Your Memoirs:  One Story at a Time
Presenter: Stephanie Kadel Taras
Date: Friday, September 26
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   Have you been thinking about sharing some of your life experiences with the next generations?  Do you want to write your memoirs, but find that trying to “get it all down” leaves you daunted?  Come to this engaging workshop for both inspiration and practical advice on writing stories from your past.  We will explore themes from your life, try out simple storytelling techniques, and discuss the writing process.  You will receive a take-home workbook full of ideas to get you started and keep you writing.  No previous writing experience is needed.  New writers are welcome! 

Stephanie Kadel Taras, Ph.D., has more than 20 years of experience as a professional writer.  Through her 12 year-old company, TimePieces Personal Biographies, she interviews family elders and helps them save their life stories in heirloom-quality books.  Stephanie has taught life story writing in various venues in Michigan and Florida.

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F1431 The Love, Lure, and Lore of the Laundry Line
Presenter: Anne E. Lawrence
Date: Monday, October 13
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   Do you remember when the clothesline was a part of everyday life, part of those bygone days when everyone went ‘online’ without the internet?  Anne Lawrence’s hobby is about nostalgia – memories of simpler times.  In this class, Anne will touch on a bit of washday history, and on sociological issues of ethnic stereotypes in the laundry industry, feminism, and the demise of the clothesline with the emergence of automatic dryers.  Anne will help revive memories of washdays, share fun stories and laundry poetry, show a wonderful video, and display some of her clothesline collectibles.  She will also tell you how her unusual hobby got its start.  So, join this class and let’s all hang out together! 

Anne Lawrence is a recent retiree from Boston, who has now made Ann Arbor her permanent home.  An alumna of Tufts University in psychology and education, she enjoyed a career in academic administration at Brandeis University.  For the past four years Anne has been enthusiastically sharing her hobby in the greater Ann Arbor area, at local senior centers, antique and garden groups, women’s clubs, retirement communities, and special groups focused on issues of memory loss.

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F1432 The Joy of Gardening
Presenter: Keith Germain
Date: Monday, October 13
Time: 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.  [Please note the 4:00 p.m. end time.]
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   In this class we will bring the gardening season to a close, with a focus on best practices for Fall and preparing for Winter while “putting the beds to bed.”  Bring all of your gardening problems and questions to this class!  Master Gardener Keith Germain will discuss new information and approaches, with a special focus on insects and plant diseases.  He will also discuss invasive species in the garden, as well as the art and science of composting.  If weather conditions permit, class members will enjoy an additional opportunity for an end-of-the-season plant exchange. 

Keith Germain has over 50 years of gardening experience, and plants his own quarter-acre garden with vegetables, herbs, and flowers.  Over the years, Keith has worked with several horticulture groups, as well as with plant and flower clubs.  He has taught gardening courses regularly with the Elderwise lifelong learning program since 1993.

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F1434 An Introduction to KenKen
Presenter: Chris Hee
Date: Monday, October 20
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   KenKen is a Sudoku-like number puzzle.  The object is to fill a 4x4 (easy) or a 6x6 (challenging) square with numbers, so that each number (1 thru 4 in the easy case, 1 thru 6 in the challenging case) appears only once in each row and once in each column.  In addition, there are “cages” consisting of a number of squares outlined in dark lines.  Each cage has a goal number and an operation (sum, difference, product of multiplication, or division), and the numbers in the cage are meant to yield that goal.  Cages of one square are freebies – providing the number that is to go in that square. In this class we will start with a few easy puzzles, and progress to a few challenging ones, outlining some helpful strategies as we go along. 

Chris Hee is Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at Eastern Michigan University.  He has taught several classes at Elderwise, including Calculus Made Accessible, A Tale of Discovery in Math, Fun with Puzzles, Cryptic Crosswords, and Zero to Infinity:  A History of Numbers.

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LIFESTYLE, HEALTH & WELLNESS Back to top

F1402 With Open Hands:  The Healing Power of Forgiveness
Presenter: Mike Murray
Dates: Fridays, September 5 and 12
Time: 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee: Members $16;  Nonmembers $25

The weak can never forgive.  Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.
-Mahatma Gandhi

Always forgive your enemies – nothing annoys them so much.
-Oscar Wilde

Description:   Why should we forgive?  The need to understand the power and place of forgiveness in our world is important in the healing process.  It is urgent that we examine the steps that lead to justice and strengthen society.  We need to understand how forgiveness improves the human condition.  How do we choose to forgive?  What are the effects of holding grudges and seeking revenge?  Through our attempts to answer these questions, we can find a way to balance our need for security with the potential for forgiveness.  We will discover that forgiveness offers the possibility of two types of peace:  peace of mind – the potential healing of old emotional wounds, and peace with others – the possibility of new, more gratifying relationships in the future.  In this class we will discuss a balanced approach to a difficult subject, and we will practice ways to forgive and heal old wounds, using established methods of mindfulness.

Mike Murray is a licensed clinical psychologist and a specialist in the field of positive psychology.  He is also an expert on mindfulness and has studied and practiced Western and Eastern methods of meditation for over 50 years.

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F1430 Personal Safety Inside and Outside Your Home
Presenter: William Stanford
Date: Monday, October 6 
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   In this class Detective William Stanford will offer helpful suggestions on self-protection, whether you are at home, in your yard or garden, taking a walk, running errands, or going shopping.  He will discuss several different ways to secure your home and personal property, and your person.  He will tell us what to watch out for, and how the criminals themselves watch out for and identify their victims.  Detective Stanford will also discuss banking security, and how to protect your personal information and bank accounts.  He will cover a variety of frauds and tricks that are commonly played on the elderly, including lottery scams.  And, he will teach us some easy ways to identify those frauds and scams. 

William Stanford has been a police officer and detective for more than 26 years.  He holds an associate’s degree from the United States Air Force Community College and a bachelor’s degree from Madonna University.  Detective Stanford joined the Ann Arbor Police Department in 1995 and is currently a Senior Detective in Major Crimes.  He is the lead arson investigator for the Ann Arbor Police and Fire Departments and a member of the hostage negotiations team for Washtenaw County.  In addition to his other duties, Bill serves as a firearms instructor and a new detective training officer.  He was honored as Ann Arbor Police Officer of the Year in 2013.

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F1437 Relieve Stiffness and Move with Confidence:  A Focus on Flexibility and Balance
Presenter: Leslie Herrala, ACSM
Date: Friday, October 31
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   Flexibility and balance are two extremely important components of any exercise plan.  Unfortunately, they are the components most often overlooked.  It is estimated that between 35-45% of otherwise healthy adults older than 65 experience a fall at least once a year.  Developing a solid balance-and-flexibility routine will not only help to prevent falls, but will also improve range of motion around joints and a sense of body control.  A focus on balance and flexibility will also decrease the chance of musculoskeletal injury, while easing performance of the activities of daily living.  During “Flexibility and Balance,” Leslie Herrala will demonstrate some basic exercises to help you move more freely and with confidence.  Everyone will be encouraged to participate! 

Leslie Herrala is an ACSM (American College of Sports Medicine) certified Health and Fitness Specialist, and holds a bachelor’s degree in kinesiology from Michigan State University.  Currently, Leslie divides her time as a personal trainer and health coach between MHealthy, the University of Michigan wellness program, and the Health and Fitness Center at Washtenaw Community College.

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F1445 ‘Tis the Season to Hang On to Reason:  Holidays on a Budget
Presenter: Kathryn Greiner
Date:  Monday, November 17
Time: 10:00 to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   If you were asked to describe the ideal holiday season, chances are you would include the company of loved ones, good food, fun, relaxation, and maybe an inch or two of snow.  It seems so simple.  But, for many of us it could not be farther from reality.  Too often, the holidays seem to exhaust rather than uplift us.  Do you sometimes feel trapped by the shopping, spending, and frenzied preparations?  Do you wish your holidays were wrapped in more meaning and less stuff?  If so, you are not alone.  In this class we will gather new ideas to help make the holidays less materialistic and more fun.  We will discuss what leads us to overspend, and how to "debt-proof" as well as simplify our holidays.  We will also share some thoughts on how to get our families "on board" with these changes. 

Kathryn Greiner is an Accredited Financial Counselor and the Director of Credit Education at the University of Michigan Credit Union.  With her unique blend of compassion, realism, and humor, Kathryn is known as the “Budget Guru” who, for more than 38 years, has been educating people and helping them find sensible, workable answers to their financial problems.

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F1454  When Disaster Strikes:  Emergency Planning and Preparedness
Presenter/Guide:  Disaster Services Associate of the American Red Cross
Date: Tuesday, October 7, Presentation and Tour at the Red Cross Building
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.  [There is no charge for this class BUT registration is required]     

Get to know us . . . Before you need us!

Description:   Each year, the American Red Cross provides relief to the victims of approximately 70,000 natural and man-made disasters across the United States, including tornadoes, blizzards, floods, and home fires.  If you have ever worried about how such a disaster would affect you, or wondered how you can better prepare, join us for this course on disaster preparedness.  You will learn how to be Red Cross Ready by focusing on three readiness goals – get a kit, have a plan, and be informed. 

A Red Cross Disaster Services Associate will guide you through constructing a preparedness kit, creating plans for disaster situations, and identifying local resources for emergency information.  The focus will be on the particular concerns of older adults, such as knowing when to shelter in place and when to evacuate.  You will gain the confidence to respond when disaster strikes close to home.  The presentation on emergency planning and preparedness will be followed by a behind-the-scenes tour of the local Red Cross chapter, and an opportunity to see how their mission in action operates.  You will step inside the state-of-the-art Blood Donation Center, visit the classrooms where instruction in lifesaving CPR and First Aid takes place, learn how the Red Cross disaster response is triggered, and how the organization supports military personnel.  Finally, you will hear stories from members of the community who have benefitted from Red Cross efforts.

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LITERATURE, POETRY & DRAMA Back to top

F1401  Masters of Lyrical Verse:  The Renaissance Poets
Presenter: Jeffrey Cordell
Dates: Fridays, September 5 and 12
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $16;  Nonmembers $25

Description:   While the English Renaissance is often defined by dramatists such as William Shakespeare, this period was unexcelled in its lyric poetry as well.  In this class we will learn about three of the most prominent English Renaissance poets:  John Donne, Ben Jonson, and George Herbert.  Each author was a master of form, and took up a range of topics that included religion, love, and politics, in ways that were distinctive with each poet.  From Donne's passionate relationships with both God and women, to Jonson's highly crafted poetic work glorifying the Sidney family's ancestral home (Penshurst), to Herbert's religious poems that find God in simple things, we will read and consider how each author imagined his world through lyric poetry. 

Jeffrey Cordell holds a Ph.D. in Renaissance literature from the University of Virginia.  He has taught literature and academic writing at Boston University, Harvard, and Alma College.  Jeffrey is presently an assistant professor in the Department of Language and Literature at Madonna University.

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F1407 Books into Movies:  A Tricky Transformation - John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath
Presenter: Cecilia Donohue
Dates: Fridays, September 19 and 26 
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon  [Please note the September 26 session may run past noon, to accommodate the length of the film.]
Fee:  Members $16;  Nonmembers $25

Recommended Text: The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck.  Reissued 2006.
                                                Penguin Classics.  ISBN number 978-0143039433.
                                                Approximate price:  $10.  Also available as an e-book.

Description:   To commemorate the 75th anniversary of its publication, John Steinbeck’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath will be the focus of this semester’s edition of the Books into Movies series.  We will discuss the novel during the first week of the class, with special attention to its lasting relevance.  In week two, we will view the highly acclaimed 1940 film adaptation of The Grapes of Wrath, directed by John Ford and starring Henry Fonda and Jane Darwell.  It is strongly recommended that students read the novel before the first class meeting.

 Cecilia Donohue is a retired professor and chair of Language and Literature at Madonna University. She is the author of Robert Penn Warrens Novels:  Feminine and Feminist Discourse and the editor of an anthology of essays on Sandra Cisneros’s Woman Hollering Creek. Cecilia currently serves on the Editorial Board of the Steinbeck Review.

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F1408  Best-Seller Book Club
Presenter: Shirley Southgate
Dates: Mondays, September 22, October 20, and November 17
Time: 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee: Members $24;  Nonmembers $35

Description:   Using prepared questions and our own observations, the discussion each month will explore
a book from the “best-seller” list.  Selected books for the Fall Term are:

September 22  The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom

October 20  The Light Between Oceans by M. L. Stedman
November 17 We Are Water by Wally Lamb

Please read The Kitchen House before the first class.  A list of discussion questions for each book will be sent prior to each session.  Shirley Southgate is a long-time member of both Elderwise and the Best-Seller Book Club.  She is an avid reader and looks forward to a lively exchange of ideas and interpretations.

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F1409 Leo Tolstoy:  War and Peace
Presenter: George Stewart
Dates: Thursdays, October 2, 9, 16, 23, and 30 
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $40;  Nonmembers $55

Description:   Reading War and Peace is a defining experience for the lover of great Western literature.  So is rereading it.  It is a large commitment, but the reward is commensurate.  Although there are many fine translators of War and Peace, George Stewart will be reading the 2007 translation by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, always reliable interpreters of Russian classic literature.  War and Peace is divided into four   Volumes (sometimes called Books) and an Epilogue.  For the first class, please read Volume One. 

George Stewart practiced law for many years in Kansas City, Chicago, Detroit, New York City, and Ann Arbor.  He is honing his retirement skills by reading, and rereading, great writers like Tolstoy.  He looks forward to sharing the pleasures of War and Peace with like-minded readers.

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F1410 Short Steinbeck: Travels with Charley and The Wayward Bus
Presenter: Cecilia Donohue
Dates: Fridays, October 3 and 24
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $16;  Nonmembers $25

Description:   While the author John Steinbeck is known primarily for his lengthier classics, such as The Grapes of Wrath and East of Eden, his shorter writings also have achieved acclaim and are worthy of reading and discussion.  This two-week course will focus on two such works:  the nonfiction memoir Travels with Charley in Search of America (1962), and the novel The Wayward Bus (1947).  After reading these books, come prepared for some very lively discussion.

  October 3
Travels with Charley in Search of America
Reissued 1986.  Penguin Classics.  ISBN 9-780140-053203
Approximate price $6.  Also available in e-book.

October 24           
The Wayward Bus
                                               
Reissued 2006.  Penguin Classics.  ISBN 978-014237872
Approximate price $12.  Also available in e-book.

Cecilia Donohue is a retired professor and chair of Language and Literature at Madonna University.  She is the author of Robert Penn Warren’s Novels: Feminine and Feminist Discourse, and the editor of an anthology of essays on Sandra Cisneros’s Woman Hollering Creek.  Cecilia currently serves on the Editorial Board of the Steinbeck Review.

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F1418 William Faulkner:  As I Lay Dying
Presenter: Kevin Eyster
Dates: Wednesdays, November 5 and 12 
Time: 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.  [Please note there is a 4:00 p.m. end time for November 12.]
Fee: Members $16;  Nonmembers $25

Description:   Published in 1930 and adapted to film by Millennium Entertainment in 2013, As I Lay Dying is William Faulkner’s fifth novel.  Consisting of 59 narratives or monologues and constructed from the individual viewpoints of 15 character-narrators, the novel centers on the Bundren family’s saga and journey to bury the family matriarch, Addie.  Our first class session will focus on the novel, and we will view the film adaptation during the second session.  A Vintage Books paperback edition of the novel (ISBN 0679736514) is available at your local libraries and bookstores.  New and used copies are also available at a reasonable price through several online book dealers.  

Kevin Eyster is a professor and Chair of the Department of Language and Literature at Madonna University.  He teaches courses in critical writing and literary analysis, American folklore and literature, African American literature, and a Special Topics offering on the fiction of William Faulkner and Toni Morrison.

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F1446 Masterpieces of 19th Century English Poetry
Presenter: Russell Robert Larson
Date: Tuesday, November 18
Time: 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   One way to evaluate poems from previous centuries is to consider whether or not they still speak to us about our lives in the 21st century.  In this class we will consider poems by the great English poets of the 19th century, such as Wordsworth, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, and Arnold.  We will first consider the poems in their historical context, and then we will explore why they might still speak to us today.  Do they still reflect on our values and experiences in meaningful ways?  Finally, we will consider the aesthetic value of the poems.  As works of art, their form, imagery, and symbolism should still inspire our admiration. 

Russell Larson received his Ph.D. in 19th century English literature from the University of Michigan.  He joined the faculty of the Department of English Language and Literature at Eastern Michigan University (EMU) in 1970, where he taught both undergraduate and graduate students, and served as department chair from 1999 to 2006.  Professor Larson’s career combined academic administration and instruction, with a focus on written communication.  He retired from EMU in 2012 and is currently Professor Emeritus of English Language and Literature.

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F1457 PTD (Petie the Dog) Productions:  Grace and Glorie       A Play by Tom Ziegler, Directed by Rick Katon
Presenters: Rick Katon and Laura Bird
Dates/Times: Pre-Performance Class:      Thursday, September 11, 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. at the Riverside Theatre
Places:  Matinee Performance: Sunday, September 21, 2:00 p.m. at the Riverside Theatre
                Post-Performance Class: Thursday, September 25, 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. at the Red Cross Building
Fees: Members $27; Nonmembers $36 [Fee includes one ticket to the play.]  Extra Tickets are $11 each.  Please see F1460 on this catalog’s Registration Form.

Description:  This little-known play tells the story of two women who have far more in common than they ever could have imagined.  Gloria “Glorie” Greenwood, lonely and disenchanted with her life in New York City,  moves to the country where she becomes a hospice worker in the home of feisty, cantankerous, and terminally ill Grace Stiles.  The last thing Grace needs, however, is a do-gooder showing up to ease her crossing into the next life.  Grace and Glorie is both a warm comedy and a poignant drama about two very different women whose paths cross at the most critical times of their lives, and who miraculously discover that their very differences are what each one needs from the other.  At first, Glorie has trouble "taking to” Grace, and Grace resents Glorie's very presence.  Their bond becomes a powerful catalyst for each of them, helping Grace make peace with her future and Glorie with her past. 

Rick Katon is in his 18th year of working with PTD Productions, as an actor, technician and, occasionally, producer and director.  He is bringing Grace and Glorie to the Riverside Arts Center stage for the second time.  He loves this show, and looks forward to discussing it with the Elderwise theater enthusiasts. 

Laura C. Bird earned her degrees in theater and theater history from Eastern Michigan University and Michigan State University.  She has taught theater history, directing, and technical theater at several institutions in Michigan and Pennsylvania.  Currently, she is a member of the theater faculty at Greenhills School in Ann Arbor.

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F1458 Eastern Michigan University (EMU) Theater:  Dr. Faustus      A Play by Christopher Marlowe, Directed by Lee Stille
Presenter: Lee Stille

Dates/Times: Pre-Performance Class: Friday, October 10, 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon at the Red Cross Building
Places: Matinee Performance: Sunday, October 12, 2:00 p.m. at EMU Quirk Theater
             Post-Performance Class: Friday, October 17, 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon at the Red Cross Building
Fees: Members $25; Nonmembers $34  [Fee includes one ticket to the play.]
           Emeritus Faculty:  Members $16; Nonmembers $25  [Fee includes two tickets to the play.]

          Extra Tickets are $9 each.  Please see F1461 on this catalog’s Registration Form.

Description:  Dr. Faustus, bored and depressed with his routine scholarly life, calls on the Devil (Mephistopheles) to help him gain magical powers.  Mephistopheles appears and makes a pact with Faustus, giving Faustus 24 years of service in exchange for the scholar’s soul.  The play follows the exploits of Faustus on his many travels but, as the 24 years come to a close, Faustus begins to dread his impending death.  He orders Mephistopheles to call upon Helen of Troy, hoping he might use her presence to impress a group of scholars he thinks might be able to help him.  The scholars are horrified at Faustus’ pact with the Devil, and pray for him.  Faustus is overcome by fear and filled with remorse . . . but, is it too late? 

Lee Stille has taught at Eastern Michigan University since 1996.  He specializes in theater arts, interpretation, and performance.  Over the past 25 years, he has provided individualized speech and dialect training for more than 200 actors, performance artists, English Language students, comedians, teachers, politicians, and lawyers.  Lee has coached and consulted for a large number of theatre productions, and his current research interests focus on voice, speech, and dialect training, and on the dramaturgy and performance of William Shakespeare.

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F1459 PTD (Petie the Dog) Productions:  You Can’t Take It With You        A Comedy by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart
Directed by Dennis Platte
Presenters: Dennis Platte and Laura Bird
Dates/Times: Pre-Performance Class:  Wednesday, November 19, 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon at the Riverside Theatre
Places:   Matinee Performance: Sunday, December 7, 2:00 p.m. at the Riverside Theatre     
Fees: Members $19; Nonmembers $26  [Fee includes one ticket to the play.] Extra Tickets are $11 each.  Please see F1462 on this catalog’s Registration Form.

Description:  You Can’t Take It With You, winner of the 1937 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, is a comedy about the Sycamores, an eccentric extended family who, at first glance, seem to be crazy.  In stark contrast to this rather endearing and somewhat wacky family, are the unhappy Kirbys, a wealthy, stuffy family filled with great self-importance.  Tony Kirby falls in love with the Sycamores’ daughter Alice, but when the two families dine together at the Sycamores’ home, class, lifestyle, and philosophy collide head-on.  It is Grandpa Martin Vanderhoff who finally steps in to . . . well, come to the play and discover how all of this ends

Dennis Platte has worked with PTD Productions since their inception 20 years ago, directing, designing, and acting in many shows over the years.  Among others, he has directed Auntie Mame and Life with Father.  His many stage roles have included Morris in Present Laughter and Willie in The Sunshine Boys.  Dennis studied theater arts at Eastern Michigan University and has worked with theaters across Michigan and in New England. 

Laura C. Bird earned her degrees in theater and theater history from Eastern Michigan University and Michigan State University.  She has taught theater history, directing, and technical theater at several institutions in Michigan and Pennsylvania.  Currently, she is a member of the theater faculty at Greenhills School in Ann Arbor.

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F1404 From Bach to Mahler:  A Look at Some of the Most Influential Composers of Western Classical Music
Presenter: Jeanette Coviak
Dates: Tuesdays, September 9, 16, 23, and 30 
Time: 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.  [Please note the 4:00 p.m. end time.]
Fee: Members $32;  Nonmembers $45

Description:   During this four-week course we will learn about eight of the most influential composers in the Western classical music tradition of the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. The class sessions will offer videos detailing highlights of each composer’s life, a look at how their music can be seen as a mirror of the times in which they lived, and opportunities to hear short recorded samples of each composer’s musical style.  Featured in this course will be:

 

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750), Germany

  Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756–1791), Austria
  Ludwig van Beethoven (1770–1827), Germany
  Frédéric François Chopin (1810–1849), Poland
  Franz Liszt (1811–1886), Hungary
  Wilhelm Richard Wagner (1813–1883), Germany
  Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840–1893), Russia
  Gustav Mahler (1860–1911), Austria

Jeanette Coviak is a long-time Elderwise member.  She is immediate past chair of the Elderwise Council and has served on the Elderwise Curriculum Committee for over ten years.  Jeanette is a former piano teacher and says that, although she is not an “expert,” she has a deep love for all kinds of music.

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F1411 The Dawn of Movie Musicals
Presenter: Henry Aldridge

Dates: Fridays, October 3 and 10 
Time: 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.  [Please note the 4:00 p.m. end time.]
Fee: Members $16;  Nonmembers $25

Description: Musicals are among the most popular and enduring of movie genres.  During the first session of this course, class members will explore the evolution of the “backstage musical,” and will watch Busby Berkeley’s 42nd Street, produced in l933.  In the second session, we will consider the “integrated musical,” with special emphasis on the work of song-and-dance partners Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers.  During this session we will enjoy watching the film Shall We Dance, released in l937. 

Henry Aldridge is Professor Emeritus of Film Studies at Eastern Michigan University, and is a popular Elderwise lecturer.  He holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from the University of North Carolina and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.  Dr. Aldridge is widely published on the subject of American movies, and has recently written a book about Ann Arbor’s Michigan Theater, where he has served as a volunteer for many years.

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F1413 A Celebration of Doo Wop:  Vocal Group Harmony, 1954-1963
Presenter: Michael Homel
Dates: Wednesdays, October 8, 15, and 22 
Time: 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee: Members $24;  Nonmembers $35

Description:   As frequent PBS fundraising specials and Aaron Neville’s CD My True Story attest, doo wop still evokes sweet memories among baby boomers.  For a decade, starting in the mid 1950s, young urban males expressed their romantic yearnings, exuberance, sorrows, and fears through complex vocal arrangements.  With falsetto swoops, bass backgrounds, and spectacular endings, inner-city youth showed off their talents as they vied for the affections of the girls of their dreams.  This three-session course develops the social context of this distinctive music, touches on forerunners (Mills Brothers, Ink Spots), then explores the performers, the songs, and their themes.  We invite all “earth angels” to “the island of love” for “a story untold” about doo wop’s complexion, its use of classic American popular song, and its influence on 1960s popular music. 

Michael Homel is Professor Emeritus of History at Eastern Michigan University.  Mike specializes in 20th century U.S. history and U.S. urban history.  He is the author of Down from Equality: Black Chicagoans and the Public Schools, and Unlocking City Hall: Exploring the History of Local Government and Politics, and other publications on urban politics and education.

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F1423 Unusual Musical Instruments
Presenters: David and Theresa Smith
Date: Monday, September 15
Time: 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.  [Please note the 4:00 p.m. end time.]
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   Join us for a fascinating adventure as we travel the world of unusual and obscure musical instruments.  In this class we will learn about many that once were popular and have since faded into relative obscurity, such as the harpsichord, clavichord, and hurdy gurdy.  We will also have an opportunity to examine a variety of instruments regarded as novelties, such as the musical saw, nail violin, theremin, and ocarina.  We will hear about the marxophone, the ukelin, and others produced at the Marxochime Colony of New Troy, Michigan, in the early 20th century.  In addition to exploring the history of all these instruments, we will be treated to their different sounds with brief musical performances by the presenters. 

David and Theresa Smith are retired support staff from Henry Ford College.  They are active musicians in several local folk music clubs, and perform on a variety of folk instruments such as the hammered and mountain dulcimers, hurdy gurdy, and autoharp.  Theresa is an accomplished folk music vocalist, and David is a woodworker and hobbyist who built his first musical instrument in 1975.  Over the past 40 years he has built 25 more, and has collected many of the most obscure and unusual. 

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F1438 Sergei Rachmaninoff:  Master Musician of the 20th Century
Presenter: Henry Aldridge
Date: Monday, November 3
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:  Widely known as the finest concert pianist of the last century, Sergei Rachmaninoff is also admired as one of the most popular composers and conductors of his time.  His beautiful concertos, symphonies, and piano music are staples of today’s orchestras.  In this class Dr. Henry Aldridge will lead us in an exploration of Rachmaninoff’s life and career, and we will have the opportunity to consider what makes Rachmaninoff’s music so compelling. Our tribute to this musical master will include a DVD performance of his Concerto No. 3 for piano and orchestra by Olga Kern, winner of the 2001 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition.  

Henry Aldridge, Professor Emeritus of Film Studies at Eastern Michigan University, is an amateur musician and a lifelong admirer of classical music.  He holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from the University of North Carolina and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.  Henry has an extensive personal library of music recordings.  He enthusiastically assisted at Ann Arbor’s Liberty Music Shop for many years.

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F1442 A History of the Dulcimers—Hammered and Mountain
Presenters: Sandi and Bob Hlavacek, and David Smith
Date: Monday, November 10
Time: 1:00 to 3:30 p.m.  [Please note the 3:30 p.m. end time.]
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   Come and explore the history and music of the dulcimers – those charming instruments people seldom see or hear, but find fascinating when they do.  As acoustic instruments become overrun by electronics in current musical trends, it is good to revive some of the instruments that once created the music we learned to love, with melody, harmony, and lyrics we can understand without blushing.  The Hammered Dulcimer predates the Bible, and the Mountain/Lap Dulcimer comes from the Scottish settlers of the Appalachian Mountains in North America.  As we learn about the background of these unique instruments, we will also enjoy a hands-on opportunity to play a dulcimer and experience a whole new world of musical fun. 

Sandi and Bob Hlavacek have lived and worked in Southeast Michigan for more than 40 years.  They discovered the dulcimer 12 years ago, and thus began their unexpected musical adventure in retirement.  The Hlavaceks have performed at Hill Auditorium and Greenfield Village, for naturalization ceremonies, and at retirement and nursing homes.  Both Sandi and Bob overcame challenges to learning to play the dulcimer, and are convinced that almost anyone can learn to play an instrument.  The process is a great brain-builder. 

David Smith is the Hlavaceks’ friend and co-performer with the Silver Strings Dulcimer Society.  Dave’s “hobby” is building musical instruments.  Mountain and Hammered dulcimers are among the 50 assorted instruments, many with unique designs, which Dave has built over the past 38 years.

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F1443 Motor City Jazz:  Detroit’s Place in Jazz History
Presenter: Nik Thompson
Date: Tuesday, November 11
Time: 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.  [Please note the 4:00 p.m. end time.]
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   The City of Detroit is renowned as one of the most important jazz centers in the United States, even today.  Detroit jazz helped to shape the future of rock ‘n’ roll, and what has become known as the unique Motown sound.  In this class we will learn about and listen to some of the leading groups and individuals who made that happen – bands such as the Bailey and Finney Orchestra, the Jean Goldkette Orchestra, and McKinney’s Cotton Pickers, and musicians including Milt Jackson, Alice Coltrane, Pepper Adams, and Geri Allen.  We will also visit some of the hottest jazz venues – the Graystone Ballroom, Gotham Hotel, and Baker’s Keyboard Lounge.  Jazz lover and jazz historian

Nik Thompson will guide us on this visit to the Detroit “scene,” both past and present.  Nik has been hosting jazz, blues, and roots music programs at WEMU 89.1 FM since 1999, and his expertise and eclectic tastes are evident in his current program SundayBest.

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NATURE & ENVIRONMENT Back to top

F1424 Visit the Sleeping Bear
Presenters: Connie and Charles Olson
Date: Thursday, September 18
Time: 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   From the time of the emergence of the Native American Sleeping Bear legend to the establishment of the National Lakeshore along the Lake Michigan coastline, the Sleeping Bear Sand Dune has been a travel destination attracting thousands of visitors to beautiful Leelanau County innorthern Michigan.  Charles (“Chuck”) Olson has known the area well since he first climbed the dune in 1939, and Connie and Chuck have their summer home in the area.  In this class, two of our favorite Elderwise vagabonds will provide a look into the history of the region, including the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, as well as some stunning views of places they consider the most interesting and appealing – such as the National Lakeshore Scenic Drive which winds its way through areas that Chuck marked for logging as far back as 1957. 

Connie Olson is an expert on genealogy and the nation’s Carnegie Libraries.  She has traveled widely across the United States, visiting libraries, museums, and other important sites that are integral to the American heritage. 

Charles Olson retired from the University of Michigan faculty in 1999, after 35 years with the School of Natural Resources and Environment.  He is an emeritus professor of forest management and forest ecology, and a Registered Forester in the State of Michigan.

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F1429 Do Sapsuckers Really Suck Sap?
Presenter: Don Chalfant
Date: Wednesday, October 1
Time: 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   Bird species get their names for a variety of reasons.  It may be because of their overall color, an  obvious (or sometimes not-so-obvious) field mark, their call or song, their habitat, their behavior . . .  or, they  may be named for a person.  Sometimes the name is derived from a word or words in a foreign language.  In this class we will explore the way in which many of our familiar and not-so-familiar birds have been named, and we will be able to see, in a marvelous array of  photographs, some of the most evident reasons for the naming. 

Don Chalfant received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Michigan.  He retired from the Ann Arbor Schools in 1995, where he taught elementary students for many years.  In retirement, Don indulges his passion for the outdoors, and especially for birding.  He has recently added nature photography to his list of enthusiastic pursuits.

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F1448 Lake Superior’s Ice Caves and the Big Islands of Lake Michigan
Presenter: Ralph Powell
Date: Friday, November 21
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:  Join us on a photo trip to four scenic Great Lakes Islands.  The ice caves and pillars on Grand Island can only be reached in winter (on foot or by snowmobile) when the ice on the shore of Lake Superior is safely frozen.  In this class we will watch Sierra Club members as they ski out to view spectacular ice formations and the historic lighthouse on Grand Island.  We will also see photos from an Elderwise trip to historic Beaver Island, and from backpacking trips to both South and North Manitou Islands in Lake Michigan.  South Manitou Island is managed primarily as a wilderness area, but has a lighthouse which is open to visitors.  North Manitou Island is an integral part of the wilderness area of Sleeping Bear National Lakeshore. 

Our presenter Ralph Powell is Professor Emeritus of Chemistry at Eastern Michigan University.  He has lived in Michigan since 1966 and served as the Elderwise Treasurer for many years.  Ralph’s several hobbies include hiking, camping, photography, and gardening.  With his wife and family he has traveled to and through all 50 of the United States.

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F1450 A World of Discovery:  The Reptile Zoo
Presenters/Guides: Staff and Stewards at the Zoo
Date: Wednesday, September 3 at the Reptile Zoo on Jackson Road
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $13;  Nonmembers $20  [Fee includes $5 charge for the tour.]

Description:   This combination class-and-tour will be offered at the World of Discovery Reptile Zoo facility at 6885 Jackson Road in Ann Arbor.  The Zoo is a conservation and rescue facility sponsored by the Great Lakes Zoological Society.  The Society’s mission is to enhance public awareness of the need for wildlife conservation and education within a balanced ecosystem.  The Zoo is a destination for families, school groups, and individuals of all ages who want to learn about its many inhabitants, including reptiles, amphibians, arachnids, insects, and birds.  The exhibits, entirely indoors, house more than 100 animals, representing over 70 exotic and indigenous Michigan species. 

We will begin our visit in the classroom, with presentations by the Zoo’s professional staff.  The presentations and the tour that follows will include hands-on opportunities.  For more details on the Reptile Zoo, please visit their website at www.glzszoo.org.  Driving directions will be sent with your registration confirmation.  There is ample free parking at the Zoo.

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F1452 The Fascinating World of Bees and Beekeeping
Presenter/Guide: Roger Sutherland
Dates: Monday, September 22 at the Red Cross Building
             Monday, September 29 at Sugar Bush
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon  [both class and tour]
Fee: Members $16;  Nonmembers $25

Description:   This course includes a class on September 22 and a field trip on September 29.  The slide-lecture program in the first session is designed to offer a close-up look at the highly organized colony of the honey bee.  We will pay close attention to honey bee biology and the serious problems facing this important insect.  We will consider the crucial relationship between flowers and honey bees, pollination, swarming, and communication among bees.  We will also discuss the history and practice of beekeeping.  During the field trip on September 29, we will visit the Sutherlands' apiary and honey house at their "Sugar Bush" farm near Ann Arbor, where we will learn about beekeeping and honey extraction.  Driving directions and parking instructions will be sent with your registration confirmation

Roger Sutherland is a naturalist and Emeritus Professor at Schoolcraft College where he taught biological sciences for 34 years.  He is a past president of the Michigan Audubon Society, the Michigan Beekeepers Association, and the Michigan Botanical Club-Huron Valley Chapter.  Roger has been a beekeeper since 1966 and is a past recipient of the Beekeeper of the Year Award.  Over the past quarter-century, Roger and his wife Mary have conducted nature, wildflower, and beekeeping programs for countless individuals and groups, including Elderwise.

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F1456 The Three R’s of Environmental Education: A Tour of the Ann Arbor Materials Recovery Facility (MRF)
Presenters/Guides:  MRF and Ecology Center Staff
Date: Thursday, October 16 at the Materials Recovery Center on Platt Road
Time: 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   Reduce, Reuse, Recycle – Those are the core principles for educating communities toward environmentally sustainable waste management.  Today, Ann Arbor, Michigan, is positioned as a model community and national leader in that effort.  Recycle Ann Arbor is a nonprofit subsidiary of Ann Arbor’s Ecology Center, an organization dedicated to creating and sustaining a healthy environment in which all of us can live, work, and play.  Recycle Ann Arbor is the premier program of its kind in the State of Michigan, offering services to households, businesses, and other municipalities.  The physical plant of Recycle Ann Arbor is the Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) located at 4150 Platt Road.  Each weekday at this site, more than 100 tons of mixed paper, metal, and glass are received, sorted, processed, “packaged,” and shipped out for reuse.  Our on-site guided tour of the MRF will provide a close-up and informed view of the processes, challenges, outcomes, and benefits of a community program based on the three R’s of environmental sustainability.  For the tour, long pants and closed-toe shoes are required, and high-heel shoes are prohibited.  Driving directions and parking instructions will be sent with your registration confirmation.

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POLITICS, POLICY, LAW & CURRENT AFFAIRS Back to top

F1412 Great Decisions
Facilitator: Joan Clauss
Dates: Wednesdays, October 8, 15, and 22
Time: 10:00 am to 12:00 noon
Fee: Members $24 Nonmembers $35

Book of Readings:  $10.  The text for this class is the Foreign Policy booklet Great Decisions 2014, which
is available for purchase from the Elderwise office. Please read Chapters 4, 6, and 8.

Description:   This discussion group focuses on international policy issues, and features video presentations and readings on topics selected by the nonpartisan Foreign Policy Association.  The Great Decisions briefing book features impartial, thought-provoking analyses on issues of concern to United States policymakers.  Each article is written by carefully selected experts, offers questions and tools for discussion, and suggested policy options for United States officials.  During the 2014 Fall semester, we will cover the following topics:

October 8
Islamic Awakening by John P. Entelis

The aftermath of the Arab Spring has resulted in unforeseen changes in the political landscape of many countries in the Near and Middle East, especially regarding the role of Islam and democracy.  Is United States foreign policy adapting successfully to all of the changes in the region?

October 15
Food and Climate by William Sweet

Even as a sixth of the world’s people suffer from chronic hunger, a changing climate threatens to wreak havoc on already insecure and vulnerable populations.  As food and water become scarce and once-fertile land becomes barren, world leaders are faced with new challenges. Can the United States lead the way to climate reform?
October 22
U.S. Trade Policy by Michael O. Moore and Robert Maxim

America’s foreign policy tools are not limited to sanctions, treaties, or military Campaigns - they  also include economic statecraft.  The “sales pitch” is simple:  promote democracy and the free market, and gain valuable diplomatic and business partners.  In the contest over global influence, is Secretary Kerry the new free market matchmaker?

Joan Clauss is a long-time member of Elderwise.  She earned her bachelor’s degree at Madonna University where a class in “Third World Countries” contributed to an interest in America’s foreign policy and world affairs.  Joan is retired from the University of  Michigan College of Engineering where she was a director of the Cooperative Education Program.  She is currently an instructor for the Ann Arbor Public Schools Recreation and Education Adapted Program.

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F1416 Taking Apart the News
Presenter: Al Chambers
Dates: Thursdays, October 30 and November 6, 13, and 20
Time: 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee: Members $32;  Nonmembers $45

Description:   The 2014 midterm elections are certain to be among the leading subjects for this October-November sequence of Taking Apart the News.  We will be looking at winners and losers, and also at the role of the media and their impact on the 2016 presidential election.  Is the strong trend towards more “point of view journalism” continuing?  We will also consider the steadily increasing importance of digital journalism as a media trend.  As always, presenter Al Chambers, now in his tenth year with this popular course, will guide the discussion to topics that appear beyond “Page 1” in the news. 

Al Chambers has a special ability to encourage class participation and generate lively discussion.  This is based on his years of experience in wire service and broadcast journalism, his time as an executive in Communications at Ford Motor Company and, more recently, his consulting activities with major companies regarding their media exposure and reputation.  Al warmly welcomes previous and new participants alike to this course.

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F1436 Introduction to Chinese Education, Then and Now
Presenter: Amy Seetoo
Date: Wednesday, October 29
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   This class provides a general survey of historical and cultural issues concerning education in China.  Beginning with the philosopher Confucius (551-479 B.C.), also known as the Great Teacher, we will follow the course of education in China through the 7th century A.D., with the establishment and perpetuation of the imperial civil service examinations, to the American influences on modern Chinese education in the 19th and 20th centuries.  We will also have an opportunity to compare the current educational systems in the People’s Republic of China and the Republic of China on Taiwan. 

Amy Seetoo arrived in the United States in 1968.  She holds master’s degrees from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (teaching English as a second language), Northern Illinois University (library science), and the University of Michigan (business administration).  Amy co-founded the Chinese American Society of Ann Arbor and the Healthy Asian Americans Project at the University of Michigan.  She has served as cultural consultant, interpreter, and language instructor, and is dedicated to promoting cultural exchange.

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F1444  Introduction to Chinese Health Care, Past and Present
Presenter: Amy Seetoo
Date: Wednesday, November 12
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   By way of the historical record and a cultural approach, Amy Seetoo offers a survey of health issues and health care delivery in China.  From the earliest origins of herbal medicine through the evolution of health beliefs and health practices, to the present day systems, we will explore the centuries-long traditions of Chinese medicine.  We will have an opportunity to compare the current health system in the People’s Republic of China with the national health system of the Republic of China on Taiwan, a system that was established in 1995. 

Amy Seetoo arrived in the United States in 1968.  She holds master’s degrees from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (teaching English as a second language), Northern Illinois University (library science), and the University of Michigan (business administration).  Amy co-founded the Chinese American Society of Ann Arbor and the Healthy Asian Americans Project at the University of Michigan.  She has served as cultural consultant, interpreter, and language instructor, and is dedicated to promoting cultural exchange.

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F1449 The 2014 Midterm Elections: In Retrospect and Looking Ahead
Presenter: Jeffrey Bernstein
Date: Tuesday, November 25
Time: 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:  The 2014 midterm elections will have taken place by the time we meet for this class.  We will discuss the results of those elections, and explore what they have to say about Barack Obama, the Republicans, and the prospects for the 2016 presidential election.  By that time, presidential candidates for 2016 will be planning the announcement of their candidacies.  How will the 2014 midterms affect their strategies?  Join us for a penetrating discussion of these and other critical political questions. 

Jeffrey Bernstein studies and teaches political science and American politics at Eastern Michigan University.  His research interests include public opinion and political behavior, citizen education, and the scholarship of teaching and learning.  Jeff is contributing author and co-editor of Citizenship Across the Curriculum (Indiana University Press, 2010) and is currently working on a book-length study that explores political cognition processes and their implications for teaching political science.

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SCIENCE & MATHEMATICS Back to top

F1419 Weighing Stars and Mapping Galaxies: How We Know What We Know about the Universe
Presenter: Philip Hughes
Dates: Thursdays, November 6, 13, and 20
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $24;  Nonmembers $35

Description:  In this class we will learn about the technology and science that allow astronomers to explore a Universe so vast that light from the most distant objects seen today began its journey before the Sun and Earth had formed.  No prior scientific background is assumed!  We will start by addressing the astronomer’s technology, through a survey of modern telescopes and instrumentation.  Some basic physics will show us how the light from stars holds the secret of their composition and structure, and how that knowledge enables us to understand their life-cycles, from gentle birth to violent death.  We will see how astronomers “weigh” stars, “map” galaxies and, indeed, the whole Universe, gaining clues to its ultimate fate.  Finally, we will explore the steps of the "distance ladder," from the planet Venus to the Sun, to nearby stars, and so on out.  Our understanding of the life-cycles of stars will take us through the Galaxy, the local group of galaxies, the local supercluster, and to the furthest reaches of what is observable. 

Philip Hughes teaches in the Department of Astronomy at the University of Michigan.  His current research interests include relativistic flows and wavelet analysis, with an emphasis on simulation and imaging.

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F1427 Women in Antarctica
Presenter: Anne S. Benninghoff
Date: Monday, September 29
Time: 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   The vignettes presented in this class will highlight some of the wives of early explorers of the Antarctic, some scientists and their research projects in the 1970s, some women of a special status (such as the first Girl Scout), and the presenter’s personal experiences. 

In November through December, 1977, Anne S. Benninghoff was a Field Researcher with the United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP).  She and her husband, Professor W.S. Benninghoff, both of them botanists, conducted a pilot study on airborne biological particles and electrostatics at field sites near McMurdo at the South Pole, and at Lake Vanda (New Zealand) in the Transantarctic Mountains.  In January, 1989, they accompanied the University of Michigan Alumni on the World Discoverer voyage to the Antarctica Peninsula.

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F1434 An Introduction to KenKen
Presenter: Chris Hee
Date: Monday, October 20
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   KenKen is a Sudoku-like number puzzle.  The object is to fill a 4x4 (easy) or a 6x6 (challenging) square with numbers, so that each number (1 thru 4 in the easy case, 1 thru 6 in the challenging case) appears only once in each row and once in each column.  In addition, there are “cages” consisting of a number of squares outlined in dark lines.  Each cage has a goal number and an operation (sum, difference, product of multiplication, or division), and the numbers in the cage are meant to yield that goal.  Cages of one square are freebies – providing the number that is to go in that square. In this class we will start with a few easy puzzles, and progress to a few challenging ones, outlining some helpful strategies as we go along. 

Chris Hee is Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at Eastern Michigan University.  He has taught several classes at Elderwise, including Calculus Made Accessible, A Tale of Discovery in Math, Fun with Puzzles, Cryptic Crosswords, and Zero to Infinity:  A History of Numbers.

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THEATER PRODUCTIONS & CLASSES Back to top

F1457 PTD (Petie the Dog) Productions:  Grace and Glorie       A Play by Tom Ziegler, Directed by Rick Katon
Presenters: Rick Katon and Laura Bird
Dates/Times: Pre-Performance Class:      Thursday, September 11, 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. at the Riverside Theatre
Places:  Matinee Performance: Sunday, September 21, 2:00 p.m. at the Riverside Theatre
                Post-Performance Class: Thursday, September 25, 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. at the Red Cross Building
Fees: Members $27; Nonmembers $36 [Fee includes one ticket to the play.]  Extra Tickets are $11 each.  Please see F1460 on this catalog’s Registration Form.

Description:  This little-known play tells the story of two women who have far more in common than they ever could have imagined.  Gloria “Glorie” Greenwood, lonely and disenchanted with her life in New York City,  moves to the country where she becomes a hospice worker in the home of feisty, cantankerous, and terminally ill Grace Stiles.  The last thing Grace needs, however, is a do-gooder showing up to ease her crossing into the next life.  Grace and Glorie is both a warm comedy and a poignant drama about two very different women whose paths cross at the most critical times of their lives, and who miraculously discover that their very differences are what each one needs from the other.  At first, Glorie has trouble "taking to” Grace, and Grace resents Glorie's very presence.  Their bond becomes a powerful catalyst for each of them, helping Grace make peace with her future and Glorie with her past. 

Rick Katon is in his 18th year of working with PTD Productions, as an actor, technician and, occasionally, producer and director.  He is bringing Grace and Glorie to the Riverside Arts Center stage for the second time.  He loves this show, and looks forward to discussing it with the Elderwise theater enthusiasts. 

Laura C. Bird earned her degrees in theater and theater history from Eastern Michigan University and Michigan State University.  She has taught theater history, directing, and technical theater at several institutions in Michigan and Pennsylvania.  Currently, she is a member of the theater faculty at Greenhills School in Ann Arbor.

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F1458 Eastern Michigan University (EMU) Theater:  Dr. Faustus      A Play by Christopher Marlowe, Directed by Lee Stille
Presenter: Lee Stille

Dates/Times: Pre-Performance Class: Friday, October 10, 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon at the Red Cross Building
Places: Matinee Performance: Sunday, October 12, 2:00 p.m. at EMU Quirk Theater
             Post-Performance Class: Friday, October 17, 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon at the Red Cross Building
Fees: Members $25; Nonmembers $34  [Fee includes one ticket to the play.]
           Emeritus Faculty:  Members $16; Nonmembers $25  [Fee includes two tickets to the play.]

          Extra Tickets are $9 each.  Please see F1461 on this catalog’s Registration Form.

Description:  Dr. Faustus, bored and depressed with his routine scholarly life, calls on the Devil (Mephistopheles) to help him gain magical powers.  Mephistopheles appears and makes a pact with Faustus, giving Faustus 24 years of service in exchange for the scholar’s soul.  The play follows the exploits of Faustus on his many travels but, as the 24 years come to a close, Faustus begins to dread his impending death.  He orders Mephistopheles to call upon Helen of Troy, hoping he might use her presence to impress a group of scholars he thinks might be able to help him.  The scholars are horrified at Faustus’ pact with the Devil, and pray for him.  Faustus is overcome by fear and filled with remorse . . . but, is it too late? 

Lee Stille has taught at Eastern Michigan University since 1996.  He specializes in theater arts, interpretation, and performance.  Over the past 25 years, he has provided individualized speech and dialect training for more than 200 actors, performance artists, English Language students, comedians, teachers, politicians, and lawyers.  Lee has coached and consulted for a large number of theatre productions, and his current research interests focus on voice, speech, and dialect training, and on the dramaturgy and performance of William Shakespeare.

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F1459 PTD (Petie the Dog) Productions:  You Can’t Take It With You        A Comedy by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart
Directed by Dennis Platte
Presenters: Dennis Platte and Laura Bird
Dates/Times: Pre-Performance Class:  Wednesday, November 19, 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon at the Riverside Theatre
Places:   Matinee Performance: Sunday, December 7, 2:00 p.m. at the Riverside Theatre     
Fees: Members $19; Nonmembers $26  [Fee includes one ticket to the play.] Extra Tickets are $11 each.  Please see F1462 on this catalog’s Registration Form.

Description:  You Can’t Take It With You, winner of the 1937 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, is a comedy about the Sycamores, an eccentric extended family who, at first glance, seem to be crazy.  In stark contrast to this rather endearing and somewhat wacky family, are the unhappy Kirbys, a wealthy, stuffy family filled with great self-importance.  Tony Kirby falls in love with the Sycamores’ daughter Alice, but when the two families dine together at the Sycamores’ home, class, lifestyle, and philosophy collide head-on.  It is Grandpa Martin Vanderhoff who finally steps in to . . . well, come to the play and discover how all of this ends

Dennis Platte has worked with PTD Productions since their inception 20 years ago, directing, designing, and acting in many shows over the years.  Among others, he has directed Auntie Mame and Life with Father.  His many stage roles have included Morris in Present Laughter and Willie in The Sunshine Boys.  Dennis studied theater arts at Eastern Michigan University and has worked with theaters across Michigan and in New England. 

Laura C. Bird earned her degrees in theater and theater history from Eastern Michigan University and Michigan State University.  She has taught theater history, directing, and technical theater at several institutions in Michigan and Pennsylvania.  Currently, she is a member of the theater faculty at Greenhills School in Ann Arbor.

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TOURS (Local) Back to top

F1450 A World of Discovery:  The Reptile Zoo
Presenters/Guides: Staff and Stewards at the Zoo
Date: Wednesday, September 3 at the Reptile Zoo on Jackson Road
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $13;  Nonmembers $20  [Fee includes $5 charge for the tour.]

Description:   This combination class-and-tour will be offered at the World of Discovery Reptile Zoo facility at 6885 Jackson Road in Ann Arbor.  The Zoo is a conservation and rescue facility sponsored by the Great Lakes Zoological Society.  The Society’s mission is to enhance public awareness of the need for wildlife conservation and education within a balanced ecosystem.  The Zoo is a destination for families, school groups, and individuals of all ages who want to learn about its many inhabitants, including reptiles, amphibians, arachnids, insects, and birds.  The exhibits, entirely indoors, house more than 100 animals, representing over 70 exotic and indigenous Michigan species. 

We will begin our visit in the classroom, with presentations by the Zoo’s professional staff.  The presentations and the tour that follows will include hands-on opportunities.  For more details on the Reptile Zoo, please visit their website at www.glzszoo.org.  Driving directions will be sent with your registration confirmation.  There is ample free parking at the Zoo.

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F1451 Tour of Pewabic Pottery of Detroit:  The Fabrication Studio, Tile Showroom, and Gallery of Studio Artists
Presenters/Guides: Pewabic Pottery Docent Staff
Date: Thursday, September 4
Time: 2:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee: Members $13;  Nonmembers $20  [Fee includes a $5 charge for the tour.]

Description:   Founded in 1903, Pewabic Pottery is a studio and school of tilework known for incandescent glazes.  The founding partners, Mary Chase Perry Stratton (the artist) and Horace James Caulkins (the high-heat kiln specialist), provided a unique and collaborative contribution to the International Arts and Crafts movement of the early 20th century.  Their work exemplified the American Craftsman Style.  The word “pewabic” derives from the Ojibwa (Chippewa) word for the color of the copper and the copper clay of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.  Pewabic Pottery of Detroit was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1991. 

This tour, led by Pewabic docents, includes an exhibit on the life of Mary Chase Perry Stratton and some museum pieces from the early years of the school.  You will also have the opportunity to observe artisans creating wares and tiles in the Fabrication Studio, several custom projects on display in the Tile Showroom, and an array of the finest among contemporary ceramic work in the Gallery of Studio Artists.  Driving directions and parking instructions will be sent with your registration confirmation.

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F1452 The Fascinating World of Bees and Beekeeping
Presenter/Guide: Roger Sutherland
Dates: Monday, September 22 at the Red Cross Building
             Monday, September 29 at Sugar Bush
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon  [both class and tour]
Fee: Members $16;  Nonmembers $25

Description:   This course includes a class on September 22 and a field trip on September 29.  The slide-lecture program in the first session is designed to offer a close-up look at the highly organized colony of the honey bee.  We will pay close attention to honey bee biology and the serious problems facing this important insect.  We will consider the crucial relationship between flowers and honey bees, pollination, swarming, and communication among bees.  We will also discuss the history and practice of beekeeping.  During the field trip on September 29, we will visit the Sutherlands' apiary and honey house at their "Sugar Bush" farm near Ann Arbor, where we will learn about beekeeping and honey extraction.  Driving directions and parking instructions will be sent with your registration confirmation

Roger Sutherland is a naturalist and Emeritus Professor at Schoolcraft College where he taught biological sciences for 34 years.  He is a past president of the Michigan Audubon Society, the Michigan Beekeepers Association, and the Michigan Botanical Club-Huron Valley Chapter.  Roger has been a beekeeper since 1966 and is a past recipient of the Beekeeper of the Year Award.  Over the past quarter-century, Roger and his wife Mary have conducted nature, wildflower, and beekeeping programs for countless individuals and groups, including Elderwise.

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F1453 A Tour of the University of Michigan North Campus Sculpture
Presenter/Guide: Ina Sandalow
Date: Thursday, October 2
Time: 1:00 to 2:30 p.m.  [Please note the 2:30 p.m. end time.]
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   This walking tour of the University of Michigan North Campus will introduce participants to world-class examples of contemporary monumental outdoor sculpture as produced by some of the leading artists of our time.  Many famous modern sculptors have contributed to the North Campus collection.  Among them are Maya Lin, Kenneth Snelson, Alexander Liberman, and Gerome Kamrowski.  These are but a sampling of the extraordinary array of artists and works of art included in this tour.  Participants will gather at the Lurie Bell Tower on North Campus and should be prepared to walk approximately a half mile.  Driving directions and parking information will be sent with your registration confirmation. 

Ina Sandalow previously taught history and law at Ann Arbor’s Pioneer High School.  She has been a docent with the University of Michigan Museum of Art for more than 15 years.  The North Campus sculpture tour is one of her favorite projects.

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F1454  When Disaster Strikes:  Emergency Planning and Preparedness
Presenter/Guide:  Disaster Services Associate of the American Red Cross
Date: Tuesday, October 7, Presentation and Tour at the Red Cross Building
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.  [There is no charge for this class BUT registration is required]     

Get to know us . . . Before you need us!

Description:   Each year, the American Red Cross provides relief to the victims of approximately 70,000 natural and man-made disasters across the United States, including tornadoes, blizzards, floods, and home fires.  If you have ever worried about how such a disaster would affect you, or wondered how you can better prepare, join us for this course on disaster preparedness.  You will learn how to be Red Cross Ready by focusing on three readiness goals – get a kit, have a plan, and be informed.  A Red Cross

Disaster Services Associate will guide you through constructing a preparedness kit, creating plans for disaster situations, and identifying local resources for emergency information.  The focus will be on the particular concerns of older adults, such as knowing when to shelter in place and when to evacuate.  You will gain the confidence to respond when disaster strikes close to home.  The presentation on emergency planning and preparedness will be followed by a behind-the-scenes tour of the local Red Cross chapter, and an opportunity to see how their mission in action operates.  You will step inside the state-of-the-art Blood Donation Center, visit the classrooms where instruction in lifesaving CPR and First Aid takes place, learn how the Red Cross disaster response is triggered, and how the organization supports military personnel.  Finally, you will hear stories from members of the community who have benefitted from Red Cross efforts.

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F1455 The Collectors:  Tour of the University of Michigan Museum of Art
Presenter/Guide:  Diane Rado
Date: Thursday, October 9 at the University of Michigan Museum of Art
Time: 1:00 to 2:30 p.m.  [Please note the 2:30 p.m. end time.]
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   The many different personalities who donated their collections to the University of Michigan Museum of Art (UMMA) helped to create a museum collection that is both high in quality and uniquely diverse.  These donors were people who loved art, who felt that art enhanced their lives, and who believed that collecting art made life more interesting.  During the later years of their lives, they wanted to pass those pleasures on by donating their collected art works to a museum, making them accessible to everyone, free of charge.  This UMMA tour will focus on some of those personalities, and on the art they loved.  We will learn about former Monuments Man Charles Sawyer, previously a distinguished director of UMMA, and successful businessman Henry Clay Lewis from Coldwater, Michigan, who opened the first art museum in the Midwest in 1869.  We will also engage with Maude Von Ketteler, an adventurous debutante from Grosse Pointe who married a German diplomat and became involved in the Chinese Boxer Rebellion (circa 1900), and with Margaret Watson Parker, a close friend of Charles Freer, of Freer Gallery fame.  For this tour, driving directions and parking instructions will be sent with your registration confirmation

Diane Rado received her bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees from the University of Michigan.  She has been a docent and tour guide at UMMA for 15 years, and says of her vocation, “We docents are always learning more and more from our curators and classes, from distinguished scholars in art history, and from the people who visit us!”

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TRAVELOGUES Back to top

F1420 Mediterranean Gems Venice and Malta: Magnets for Traders and Travelers
Presenter: Gerlinda Melchiori
Dates: Fridays, November 7 and 14
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $16;  Nonmembers $25

Description:   For centuries, people from countries surrounding the Mediterranean Sea easily navigated between Asia, Europe, and Africa.  The trade exchanges and the search for natural resources eventually led to the cultural exchange of ideas, sciences, ideologies, faiths, mythologies, art, and lifestyles.  The Republics of Venice and Malta are excellent examples of the rise and fall of several trading empires, and of the culture they disseminated across this historically intense geo-political terrain.  Although no longer super powers today, these two Mediterranean gems have become magnets for historians, travelers, and art connoisseurs.

November 7
Beautiful, Romantic Venice:  A Gondola Ride on the Grand Canal
Considered by many to be one of the most beautiful cities in the world, the Venetian lagoon, and its hinterland, the Veneto region, offer a spectacular experience.  We will first travel back through the fascinating and tumultuous history of the Venetian trading empire, and its famous artists and oligarchs.  Then we will take a gondola ride through the “Most Serene Republic.”  We will glide under bridges, past opulent palaces and basilicas, view villas once occupied by Vivaldi, Wagner, and Titian, and finally pass by boutiques of masks and Murano glass.  We will also stop along the way to visit several other famous sites such as the Jewish Ghetto.

November 14
Malta:  A History of Conquest, Culture, and Intrigue

Following a short history of the island, we will discover the treasures of the ancient capital of Mdina (briefly visited by Saint Paul), and Malta’s present-day capital, Valletta.  Founded by Grand Master Valletta of the Maltese Order, the city of Valletta displays massive city walls and strategic defense positions, which in 1565 were significant in preventing the expansion of the Ottoman Empire into Europe.  We will visit baroque churches, spectacular palaces, and view vast art collections (including a famous Caravaggio) of the Grand Masters of the Holy Order of Saint John.  Finally, we will wander around the archipelago’s beautiful beaches, caves, and archaeological sites.

Gerlinda Melchiori has enjoyed contributing to Elderwise for several years.  After earning two degrees in European history and business, she received her doctorate in higher education management from the University of Michigan, where she later enjoyed a rewarding career in research administration.  Now retired, Gerlinda has served the last 15 years as a management consultant to universities in Europe, Central and East Asia, the Middle East, and Africa.  Her presentations reflect her special knowledge of history, aesthetics and the arts, business, and education.  Gerlinda welcomes class participation and encourages questions and discussion.

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F1424 Visit the Sleeping Bear
Presenters: Connie and Charles Olson
Date: Thursday, September 18
Time: 1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:   From the time of the emergence of the Native American Sleeping Bear legend to the establishment of the National Lakeshore along the Lake Michigan coastline, the Sleeping Bear Sand Dune has been a travel destination attracting thousands of visitors to beautiful Leelanau County innorthern Michigan.  Charles (“Chuck”) Olson has known the area well since he first climbed the dune in 1939, and Connie and Chuck have their summer home in the area.  In this class, two of our favorite Elderwise vagabonds will provide a look into the history of the region, including the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, as well as some stunning views of places they consider the most interesting and appealing – such as the National Lakeshore Scenic Drive which winds its way through areas that Chuck marked for logging as far back as 1957. 

Connie Olson is an expert on genealogy and the nation’s Carnegie Libraries.  She has traveled widely across the United States, visiting libraries, museums, and other important sites that are integral to the American heritage. 

Charles Olson retired from the University of Michigan faculty in 1999, after 35 years with the School of Natural Resources and Environment.  He is an emeritus professor of forest management and forest ecology, and a Registered Forester in the State of Michigan.

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F1448 Lake Superior’s Ice Caves and the Big Islands of Lake Michigan
Presenter: Ralph Powell
Date: Friday, November 21
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $8;  Nonmembers $15

Description:  Join us on a photo trip to four scenic Great Lakes Islands.  The ice caves and pillars on Grand Island can only be reached in winter (on foot or by snowmobile) when the ice on the shore of Lake Superior is safely frozen.  In this class we will watch Sierra Club members as they ski out to view spectacular ice formations and the historic lighthouse on Grand Island.  We will also see photos from an Elderwise trip to historic Beaver Island, and from backpacking trips to both South and North Manitou Islands in Lake Michigan.  South Manitou Island is managed primarily as a wilderness area, but has a lighthouse which is open to visitors.  North Manitou Island is an integral part of the wilderness area of Sleeping Bear National Lakeshore. 

Our presenter Ralph Powell is Professor Emeritus of Chemistry at Eastern Michigan University.  He has lived in Michigan since 1966 and served as the Elderwise Treasurer for many years.  Ralph’s several hobbies include hiking, camping, photography, and gardening.  With his wife and family he has traveled to and through all 50 of the United States.

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