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Spring Classes 2014

Art & Architechture | Film & Video | History, Culture & Religion | Hobbies & Sports | Lifestyle, Health & Wellness |
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| Theater Productions & Classes | Tours | Travelogues

 ART & ARCHITECTURE

S1414  Science, Art, and Spirituality
Presenter:  Michael R. Kapetan
Dates:  Mondays, June 9 and 23
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $10; Nonmembers $20

Description:  Doing science, creating art, and practicing spirituality constitute three of mankind’s greatest and most long-lived enterprises.  The boundaries of each of these fundamental human activities remain exquisitely elastic.  We combine them in very different ways in different times and places.  As they run parallel, interweave, intersect – even collide – and touch on the slightest tangents, they fashion and refashion the farthest frontiers of our imagination.  Without science, art becomes hollow.  Without art, science becomes hopeless.  Without spirituality, neither can have lasting value.  Together, they can become the basis for wisdom.  This course will examine the interplay of the three at pivotal times in human history:  the ancient Stone Age, the era of classical Greece, the Renaissance, the dawn of the modern industrial world, and the present day. 

Michael R. Kapetan is an artist whose own work is informed by the scientific, the aesthetic, and the spiritual as he creates holy images for churches and synagogues, and unique solar sculptures that mark the turning of the seasons. 
Mike is retired from the University of Michigan where he taught for more than 20 years in the School of Art and Design and the Department of History of Art.  He currently resides in Ann Arbor where he practices his art and his craft in a home studio.

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S1416  Samurai:  Beyond the Sword
Presenter:  Docent Staff from the Detroit Institute of Arts
Date:  Tuesday, April 22 at Cleary University
Time:  1:00 to 2:30 p.m.  (Please note the 2:30 p.m. end time.)
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  This class presentation at Cleary University provides an introduction to a very special exhibition being offered at the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA):  Samurai: Beyond the Sword.  We will experience the nuanced culture of Edo Japan’s revered warrior elite, the samurai.  The exhibition tells their story through 125 works of art, among them helmets and sword blades, suits of armor, painted scenes of nature, objects of the tea ceremony, paintings of religious figures, and of epic battles, Noh theater costumes, and illustrated classical literature.  We will receive an in-depth view of the supreme military rulers (shogun), the regional lords (daimyo), and soldiers who sought balance between military and cultural pursuits, between awareness and mindfulness.  These leaders were not only fierce fighters but patrons of the arts and sophisticated artists and scholars themselves during the relatively peaceful 250 years of the Edo period (1603 – 1868). 

A professional Docent from the DIA will be the presenter for this class at Elderwise.  The exhibition Samurai: Beyond the Sword is on display at the DIA from March 9 through June 1, 2014.  It is based on the traveling exhibition Lethal Beauty: Samurai Weapons and Armor from the collection of the Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture (Hanford, California).

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S1419  The Popes of Baroque Rome and Their Architecture
Presenter:  Kingsbury Marzolf
Date:  Thursday, April 10
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  After a troubled time in the history of the Roman Catholic Church, with the Avignon Exile followed by the Schism, Martin V was chosen as pope in the year 1417.  He returned to Rome from exile and began the long and arduous task of restoring the city to make it a suitable capital for the renewed church.  For the next three and one-half centuries, much building took place, including the construction of a new Saint Peter’s basilica between1506 and 1626.  The illustrated presentation in this class will review the reigns of 43 popes, ending in 1769, and will examine the architectural work promoted by these men and the architects who served them. 

Kingsbury Marzolf is an architect and native of Chicago.  He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Michigan where he joined the architecture faculty in 1963.  Over the past half century, Kingsbury has taught the history of architecture and urban development at the University of Michigan and in Europe.  He retired in 1999 and is currently Professor Emeritus of Architecture at the University of Michigan.

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S1421  Cartoons and Comics 101:  An Introduction to Mirth
Presenter:  Richard Rubenfeld
Date:  Wednesday, April 16
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  Cartoons and comics are so universal in today’s world, it is a challenge to discover the origins of how they communicate.  In the ancient and medieval world, artworks were unique.  Direct experiences were required in order to understand them.  With the introduction of printmaking, images could be created in multiples, enabling many people to see them.  Strategies initially used by painters and sculptors were appropriated and expanded upon, including caricature, word balloons, and sequential storytelling, thus forming the basis for the comics media today.  In this class we will reveal the origins of editorial and panel cartoons, comic strips, comic books, and graphic novels.  Prior to the class, participants are encouraged to visit Professor Rubenfeld’s exhibition of original cartoon and comic art, KAPOW! COMICS RETURN TO EASTERN, displayed at the University Gallery of Eastern Michigan University from March 10 through April 16. 

Richard Rubenfeld received his master’s degree and his Ph.D. in art history from The Ohio State University.  He teaches a wide range of classes on modern and post-modern art to both graduate and post-graduate students at Eastern Michigan University, and has curated or co-curated several exhibitions of comic and other pop culture art forms.

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S1423  From Wild Wilderness to Frank Lloyd Wright: Michigan's Architectural History
Presenter:  Rochelle Balkam
Date:  Thursday, April 17
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  In this class we will focus on Michigan’s architectural heritage – from Native American wigwams to Frank Lloyd Wright’s iconic dwellings.  Class participants will learn about many kinds of buildings – including the grand and not so grand.  Presenter Rochelle Balkam will introduce us to Michigan’s great architects and their work.  We will view the commercial and residential building styles that are most commonly found in our state.  We will hear about styles that were successful, and about others that were not.  As Winston Churchill said, "We shape our buildings, and afterwards our buildings shape us.”  Handouts on Michigan architectural styles will accompany the presentation. 

Rochelle Balkam has taught Michigan history at Eastern Michigan University (EMU) for 23 years.  She holds an M.A. degree in history and an M.S. in historic preservation from EMU, and is Chair of the Friends of the Townhall School on the EMU campus.  Rochelle serves on the board of the Michigan One-Room Schoolhouse Association, and is a former board member of the Historical Society of Michigan.

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S1428  Lapis Lazuli
Presenter:  Boyd Chapin
Date:  Wednesday, May 7
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  The subject of lapis lazuli (ultramarine blue) is a direct outcome of Boyd Chapin’s personal artistic interests and his volunteer activity at the Detroit Institute of Arts.  His discussion here will include the history of lapis lazuli from ancient to modern times, and its many variations as it appears in multiple works of art, burial chambers, the medieval Books of Hours, stained glass windows, Renaissance paintings, and modern art forms. 

Attorney, artist, volunteer, and Detroit native Boyd Chapin returns to Elderwise to present and discuss the fascinating history of the gem lapis lazuli and its compelling blue pigment.  He is a graduate of Wayne State University and Senior Trial Attorney for Garan Lucow Miller, PC, and has maintained a lifelong interest in and passion for the world of art.  From painting and exhibiting his own works (pencil, oil, and acrylics), to illuminating the works of others as a docent for the Detroit Institute of Arts, Boyd continually looks to share his passion with others whenever he can.

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S1442  Japan's Floating World:  The Art of Ukiyo-e
Presenter and Guide:  Diane Rado
Date:  Friday, April 11 at the University of Michigan Museum of Art
Time:  3:00 to 4:00 p.m.  (Please note the 3:00 p.m. start time.)
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10
Class Size:  Enrollment for this class is limited to 10 attendees.

Description:  The first ukiyo-e paintings and woodblock prints “of the evanescent, floating world” appeared in Edo (present day Tokyo) in 17th century Japan.  They portrayed the world of Yoshiwara hedonism, fashion, and style.  The Yoshiwara district was a city within the city, a warren of bachelors on the loose, pleasures of the moon, cherry blossoms, Kabuki theater, and cross-dressing actors.  The art of ukiyo-e captured these images, as well as those of the courtesan, the prostitute and, later, the girl-next-door with mask-like face, on parade or in brothels.  On this tour we will examine the historical background of the emergence of the Yoshiwara district and its unique art forms.  Presenter and guide Diane Rado will explain the process of creating the woodblock prints of hanging and horizontal scrolls, and pillar painting.  We will also see items such as kimono and obi, samurai accessories, and tea ceremony implements, all found in the renowned collection of Asian art at the University of Michigan Museum of Art.  Driving directions and parking instructions will be sent with your registration confirmation. 

Diane Rado received her bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees from the University of Michigan.  She has been a docent and tour guide at UMMA for 14 years, and says of her vocation, “We docents are always learning more and more from our curators and classes, from distinguished scholars in art history, and from the people who visit us!” 

Register  

 

FILM and VIDEO Back to top

S1411  William Faulkner:  Intruder in the Dust
Presenter:  Kevin Eyster
Dates:  Wednesdays, May 14 and 21
Time:  1:00 to 4:00 p.m.  (Please note the 4:00 p.m. end time.)
Fee:  Members $10; Nonmembers $20

Description:  Published in 1948 and adapted to film by MGM in 1949, Intruder in the Dust is William Faulkner’s fourteenth novel.  It centers on the African American character Lucas Beauchamp, who is accused of murdering Vinson Gowrie, a white Southerner.  To save Lucas from being lynched, the adolescent Charles “Chick” Mallison must solve the crime.  The post-World War II setting of the novel resonates in the film adaptation, shot on location in Oxford, Mississippi.  Our first class session will focus on the novel, and the second on the film adaptation, which we will view during the second session.  A paperback edition of the novel (Vintage Books, ISBN 0679736514) is available at local libraries and bookstores.  New and used copies are also available at a reasonable price through several online book dealers. 

Kevin Eyster is a professor and Chair of the Department of Language and Literature at Madonna University.  He teaches courses in critical writing and literary analysis, American folklore and literature, African American literature, and a Special Topics offering on the fiction of William Faulkner and Toni Morrison.

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S1438  The Genius of Charlie Chaplin
Presenter:  Ira Konigsberg
Date:  Wednesday, June 4
Time:  1:00 to 4:00 p.m.  (Please note the 4:00 p.m. end time.)
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  The eminent Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw once called Charlie Chaplin “the only genius to come out of the movie industry,” and film critic Andrew Sarris said that Chaplin was “arguably the single most important artist produced by the cinema, certainly its most extraordinary performer and probably still its most universal icon.”  Charlie Chaplin was a comic genius who not only helped shape the movies, but created some of the funniest and yet affecting films in screen history.  For this class, we will watch and then discuss one of his comic masterpieces, Modern Times, not only for the fun of it, but also to understand his art and genius while developing some insights into the nature of comedy and the function of laughter in general. 

Ira Konigsberg is Professor Emeritus of Film and English at the University of Michigan.  From 1988 to 1995 he directed and developed the University’s Program in Film and Video Studies.  His books include The Complete Film Dictionary, which was the standard work of its kind in both film studies and the film industry for many years.

Register  

 

HISTORY, CULTURE & RELIGION Back to top

S1414  Science, Art, and Spirituality
Presenter:  Michael R. Kapetan
Dates:  Mondays, June 9 and 23
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $10; Nonmembers $20

Description:  Doing science, creating art, and practicing spirituality constitute three of mankind’s greatest and most long-lived enterprises.  The boundaries of each of these fundamental human activities remain exquisitely elastic.  We combine them in very different ways in different times and places.  As they run parallel, interweave, intersect – even collide – and touch on the slightest tangents, they fashion and refashion the farthest frontiers of our imagination.  Without science, art becomes hollow.  Without art, science becomes hopeless.  Without spirituality, neither can have lasting value.  Together, they can become the basis for wisdom.  This course will examine the interplay of the three at pivotal times in human history:  the ancient Stone Age, the era of classical Greece, the Renaissance, the dawn of the modern industrial world, and the present day. 

Michael R. Kapetan is an artist whose own work is informed by the scientific, the aesthetic, and the spiritual as he creates holy images for churches and synagogues, and unique solar sculptures that mark the turning of the seasons.  Mike is retired from the University of Michigan where he taught for more than 20 years in the School of Art and Design and the Department of History of Art.  He currently resides in Ann Arbor where he practices his art and his craft in a home studio.

Register  

S1417  The Toledo War
Presenter:  Donald Faber
Date:  Wednesday, April 9
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  Most sports enthusiasts in Michigan are familiar with the Michigan-Ohio football rivalry, an intense but usually good-natured contest that stretches back over one hundred years.  However, far fewer people know that in the early 19th century Michigan and Ohio were locked in a different kind of battle – a territorial battle that began before Michigan became a state.  The Toledo War of 1835-1836 erupted as a conflict over a 468 square-mile border region now known as the Toledo Strip.  The resolution of the conflict was critical to Michigan’s achieving statehood. 

Don Faber, Ann Arbor historian and journalist, has enjoyed a long and multi-faceted career as a participant in Michigan politics and as an editor and columnist with The Ann Arbor News.  Don won several awards for his columns, notably “Faber’s World,” and opinion pieces.  His book The Toledo War (University of Michigan Press, 2008) was named a Notable New Book by the Michigan Library Association, and was the Michigan Historical Society’s first-prize winner in history writing.  Don is also the author of The Boy Governor: Stevens T. Mason and the Birth of Michigan Politics (University of Michigan Press, 2012).

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S1418  Exploring the World of Kites
Presenter:  David and Theresa Smith
Date:  Wednesday, April 9
Time:  1:00 to 4:00 p.m.  (Please note the 4:00 p.m. end time.)
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  Do you believe that kite flying is just for kids?  No way!  Join David and Theresa Smith for their fascinating and informative presentation on the wonders of the many kiting traditions around the world.  In this class we will learn about primitive kite fishing techniques in the Pacific Islands, the centuries-old kite traditions of Thailand, the fighting kites of India, and team kite festivals in Japan.  We will also fast-forward to 19th century scientific and military applications of kite technology.  And, we will explore the explosion in kite design through the use of modern high tech materials and designs over the past 40 years.  The presenters will provide informational handouts on where to buy and how to make kites, and on regional kiting events.  They will also bring magazines and books on kiting. 

David and Theresa Smith are retired support staff from Henry Ford Community College.  They have attended many kiting festivals and have exhibited their large collection of traditional, ethnic, homemade, and modern kites at Madonna University, Henry Ford Community College, and Dearborn Heights Library.

Register  

S1419  The Popes of Baroque Rome and Their Architecture
Presenter:  Kingsbury Marzolf
Date:  Thursday, April 10
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  After a troubled time in the history of the Roman Catholic Church, with the Avignon Exile followed by the Schism, Martin V was chosen as pope in the year 1417.  He returned to Rome from exile and began the long and arduous task of restoring the city to make it a suitable capital for the renewed church.  For the next three and one-half centuries, much building took place, including the construction of a new Saint Peter’s basilica between1506 and 1626.  The illustrated presentation in this class will review the reigns of 43 popes, ending in 1769, and will examine the architectural work promoted by these men and the architects who served them. 

Kingsbury Marzolf is an architect and native of Chicago.  He earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Michigan where he joined the architecture faculty in 1963.  Over the past half century, Kingsbury has taught the history of architecture and urban development at the University of Michigan and in Europe.  He retired in 1999 and is currently Professor Emeritus of Architecture at the University of Michigan.

Register  

S1423  From Wild Wilderness to Frank Lloyd Wright: Michigan's Architectural History
Presenter:  Rochelle Balkam
Date:  Thursday, April 17
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  In this class we will focus on Michigan’s architectural heritage – from Native American wigwams to Frank Lloyd Wright’s iconic dwellings.  Class participants will learn about many kinds of buildings – including the grand and not so grand.  Presenter Rochelle Balkam will introduce us to Michigan’s great architects and their work.  We will view the commercial and residential building styles that are most commonly found in our state.  We will hear about styles that were successful, and about others that were not.  As Winston Churchill said, "We shape our buildings, and afterwards our buildings shape us.”  Handouts on Michigan architectural styles will accompany the presentation. 

Rochelle Balkam has taught Michigan history at Eastern Michigan University (EMU) for 23 years.  She holds an M.A. degree in history and an M.S. in historic preservation from EMU, and is Chair of the Friends of the Townhall School on the EMU campus.  Rochelle serves on the board of the Michigan One-Room Schoolhouse Association, and is a former board member of the Historical Society of Michigan.

Register  

S1425  Woody Guthrie:  An American Original
Presenter:  Michael Homel
Date:  Wednesday, April 30
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  Most of us know "This Land Is Your Land," "So Long, It's Been Good to Know You," and other familiar Woody Guthrie songs.  In this class we will learn about the extraordinary life story of an unusual man who, during a too-brief career, wrote thousands of songs – from Dust Bowl ballads to political protests to lyrics and music for children.  Woody Guthrie opened the way to the folk music revival of the late 1950s and 1960s, inspired Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen, and was a model for cultural rebels of the 1960s and 1970s.  In this class we will hear many recordings of Guthrie performing his songs. 

Michael Homel is a Professor Emeritus of History at Eastern Michigan University.  Mike specializes in 20th century U.S. history and U.S. urban history.  He is the author of Down from Equality: Black Chicagoans and the Public Schools, and Unlocking City Hall: Exploring the History of Local Government and Politics, and other publications on urban politics and education.

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S1427  Zero to Infinity:  A History of Numbers
Presenter:  Chris Hee
Date:  Thursday, May 1
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  One, two, buckle my shoe.  Three, four . . .
We learn our numbers at an early age, but we rarely consider the when and where of how they came to be.  In this class we will begin by discussing the development of systems of Numeration.  We will journey back in time to the numeral systems of ancient Babylonia, and those developed by the Egyptians and the Romans.  Our journey will bring us to the significance of a numeral for zero, as devised by the Arabs and the scholars of India, and separately by the Mayan people of the Western hemisphere.  We will then look at the mathematical development of the careful definition of numbers, including integers, rational numbers (fractions), real numbers, and complex numbers.  Finally, we will discover that there are an infinite number of infinities.   

Chris Hee is a Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at Eastern Michigan University.  He has taught several classes at Elderwise, including Calculus Made Accessible, A Tale of Discovery in Math, Sudoku, Fun with Puzzles, and Cryptic Crosswords.

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S1432  Reflecting on Nelson Mandela: A Transcendent Figure of Modern History
Presenter:  Ronald C. Woods
Date:  Thursday, May 15
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  The recent passing of Nelson Mandela has generated much-deserved attention to his singular significance in the history of South Africa’s emergence as a self-determining nation.  In many ways, this former guerrilla fighter, political prisoner, and first democratically elected president of his nation cast an imprint on history that extends far beyond South Africa and the African continent.  In this class we will explore the idea of Mandela as a transcendent figure of the Age of Modernity.  This exploration integrates a comparative look at other political intellectuals of the 20th century African diaspora – most notably George Padmore, W.E.B. Dubois, and Martin Luther King, Jr.  We will also examine Nelson Mandela’s tour de force, offered in his defense in his 1964 treason trial which preceded a sentence of life imprisonment.  Also known as his “Statement from the Dock in the Rivonia Trial,” Mandela’s defense offers strong comparisons to Fidel Castro’s “History Will Absolve Me” as one of the premier examples of political oratory emanating from the mid 20th century challenge to the vestiges of European colonialism. 

Ronald C. Woods is a professor of Africology and African American Studies at Eastern Michigan University, and an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies at the University of Michigan.  A former poverty law attorney, he specializes in race, law, and public policy.  He is a consultant to the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, and currently serves as the President of the Ann Arbor Housing Commission.

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S1435  Music of the Civil Rights Movement
Presenter:  Michael Homel
Date:  Wednesday, May 28
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  Group song played a key role in the southern black civil rights movement of the 1960s.  In this class we will explore the origins of civil rights music, and discuss the ways in which it bolstered nonviolent direct action campaigns for integration and equality.  Presenter Mike Homel will outline the major civil rights episodes of the era.  We will hear recordings both by civil rights participants and by performers who were not a part of the movement, yet nevertheless promoted its aims. 

Michael Homel is a Professor Emeritus of History at Eastern Michigan University.  Mike specializes in 20th century U.S. history and U.S. urban history.  He is the author of Down from Equality: Black Chicagoans and the Public Schools, and Unlocking City Hall: Exploring the History of Local Government and Politics, and other publications on urban politics and education.

Register 

S1439  Native American Women – Mothers and Warriors
Presenter:  Kathleen Chamberlain
Date:  Thursday, June 5
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  Did you know that American Indian women once participated in the fur trade, headed families and clans, and even served as chiefs?  These were just some of the traditional roles available to native women.  After political and religious leaders in the United States determined that all American Indians must give up their cultures and assimilate into the mainstream, Native American women saw their roles constrict and their status dwindle.  In this class we will examine the varied and vital roles played by Native American women, why those women were forced to accept subservient positions, and how they have re-emerged to take leadership roles in politics, health care, and the arts.  We will look first at native peoples among the Great Lakes tribes, and then briefly compare them with American Indian women in other areas. 

Kathleen Chamberlain is a professor of Native American history at Eastern Michigan University.  She received her Ph.D. from the University of New Mexico and has published four books, including Under Sacred Ground, A History of Navajo Oil, and Victorio, Apache Warrior and Chief.

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S1441  A Journey through Japanese History
Presenters:  Russell and Lonnie Haines
Date:  Wednesday, June 11
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  A tour of Japan is really a journey through Japanese history.  This is what Russ and Lonnie Haines discovered on their recent visit.  Exquisite examples of Japan’s unique cultural heritage are everywhere to be seen, carefully preserved and protected by a people who treasure their past.  In this remarkable PowerPoint presentation, Russ and Lonnie will show us some of Tokyo’s treasures (Ueno Park, the Imperial Palace, Asakusa Temple, the Ginza, and the Tsukiji Fish Market).  Moving south, we will see the Great Buddha of Kamakura, Mt. Fuji in the distance, and Hakone, a favorite Japanese vacation spot.  In Kanazawa, north of the Sea of Japan, we will explore unique farm houses known as gassho zukuri or “praying hands.”  In Kyoto we will visit many gardens, temples, and shrines, and in Hiroshima, the Peace Park.  We will also delight in the unique beauty of Japan’s southern islands.  Russ and Lonnie will accompany their presentation with background on Japan’s political, military, and religious institutions, and important cultural dimensions such as social customs and etiquette, artistic traditions, and culinary tastes. 

Russell Haines received his master’s degree in education administration from the University of Michigan.  He found that he much preferred working with students and spent more than 30 years teaching in a variety of fields.  Russell’s primary classroom environment was the computer lab where he helped students learn new technological skills. 

Lonnie Haines received her undergraduate degree in mathematics and science from the University of Detroit Mercy and her master’s degree in the teaching of science from the University of Michigan.  Over the next 30 years, she enjoyed a successful career in teaching scientific subjects.  Lonnie is an accomplished artist in the genres of watercolor and acrylic painting.  Both Russ and Lonnie are retired and delight in traveling together to distant and exotic destinations around the world.

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S1446   Happy Birthday Henry!  A Tour of Henry Ford Historic Sites
Presenter and Guide:  Steve Stanford
Date:  Friday, June 13
Time:  8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.  (Please note this is an all-day tour.)
Fee:  Members $69; Nonmembers $74  (Fees include lunch at Maccabees at Midtown.**)
Tour Size:  This tour is limited to 46 participants, including spaces for two wheelchairs.
Description:  Join this narrated tour of Ford historic landmarks in Dearborn and Detroit, and celebrate the 150th birthday of legendary American industrialist, Henry Ford.  Henry’s Model T put the world on wheels, and he revolutionized factory work with the moving assembly line and the $5-a-day wage.  Our own Ford historian, Steve Stanford, will narrate and chronicle Henry Ford’s fascinating story as we tour sites in Dearborn and Detroit that were critical to his life and the evolution of the Ford Motor Company.  Hailed as a visionary and an innovator, Henry Ford was also a man of contradictions.  He embraced the future, but he also clung to the past.  As we visit several historic sites, Steve will share Henry’s triumphs and tragedies, while spellbinding us with revelations of the private man behind the public image.  This tour is offered by Bianco Tours & Transportation.  The motor coach departs from Cleary University parking lot at 8:00 a.m. and returns there at 5:00 p.m. on the day of the tour.  The tour package includes lunch at Maccabees at Midtown restaurant and a guided visit to the Ford Piquette Plant.  Detailed information is available at the Elderwise office, including a flyer where you can indicate your menu choice for lunch. 

Steve Stanford is a retired Oakland County Project Manager.  He has previously offered numerous presentations on Ford-related subjects for Elderwise.  Steve is a participant in the Henry Ford 150 project, celebrating Henry’s 150th birthday (2013).  Steve is also a member of the Henry Ford Heritage Association and the Society of Automotive Historians.

**Maccabees at Midtown - This new restaurant is located in the historic Maccabees Building designed by Henry Ford’s favorite architect Albert Kahn.  Built in 1927 as the headquarters of the fraternal organization Knights of the Maccabees, this neo-gothic highrise, with art deco influences, once housed the WXYZ radio and television studios where the first Lone Ranger radio show debuted in 1933.

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HOBBIES & SPORTS Back to top

S1402  Creative Writing
Presenter:  Jane Bridges
Dates and Times: 
Mondays, April 7, 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.; May 5, 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon;

June 2, 1:00 to 4:00 p.m., and June 30, 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. (Please note the 4:00 p.m. end time.)
Fee:  Members $20; Nonmembers $40 
Class Size:  Enrollment for this class is limited to 12 attendees.

Description:  For those seeking a gentle introduction to putting pen to paper, Jane Bridges, retired schoolteacher and published poet, offers a relaxing atmosphere in which to explore your ambitions.  Whether you are seeking simply to jot down memories or write a short history of past events, or possibly even venture into the realm of published writing, this class is for you.  No textbooks, no lectures, and no PowerPoint – just pen, paper, and plenty of down-home supportive chatter.  With a class size limited to 12 eager learners, you will never feel overwhelmed or overlooked, but you will meet new friends whose company you will enjoy the entire term. 

Jane Bridges grew up in Texas and New Hampshire, and in India.  She has lived in Ann Arbor for more than 50 years, and has taught writing in both public and private schools.  Jane’s poems have been published, or accepted for publication, in the journals Margie, Sow’s Ear Poetry Review, Third Wednesday, and The MacGuffin.  In retirement, Jane draws on her experiences to guide others with their writing skills, style, and projects.

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S1407  The Joy of Gardening and Plant Exchange
Presenter:  Keith Germain
Dates:  Mondays, April 28 and May 5 and 12
Time:  1:00 to 4:00 p.m.  (Please note the 4:00 p.m. end time.)
Fee:  Members $15; Nonmembers $30

Description:  Bring all of your gardening problems and questions to this course!  Master Gardener Keith Germain will discuss new information and approaches, with a special focus on insects and plant diseases.  He will also discuss invasive species in the garden, as well as the art and science of composting.  If weather conditions permit, class members will enjoy an additional opportunity for plant exchange. 

Keith Germain has over 50 years of gardening experience and plants his own quarter-acre garden with vegetables, herbs, and flowers.  Over the years, Keith has worked with several horticulture groups, as well as with plant and flower clubs.  He has taught gardening courses regularly with the Elderwise lifelong learning program since 1993.

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S1418  Exploring the World of Kites
Presenter:  David and Theresa Smith
Date:  Wednesday, April 9
Time:  1:00 to 4:00 p.m.  (Please note the 4:00 p.m. end time.)
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  Do you believe that kite flying is just for kids?  No way!  Join David and Theresa Smith for their fascinating and informative presentation on the wonders of the many kiting traditions around the world.  In this class we will learn about primitive kite fishing techniques in the Pacific Islands, the centuries-old kite traditions of Thailand, the fighting kites of India, and team kite festivals in Japan.  We will also fast-forward to 19th century scientific and military applications of kite technology.  And, we will explore the explosion in kite design through the use of modern high tech materials and designs over the past 40 years.  The presenters will provide informational handouts on where to buy and how to make kites, and on regional kiting events.  They will also bring magazines and books on kiting. 

David and Theresa Smith are retired support staff from Henry Ford Community College.  They have attended many kiting festivals and have exhibited their large collection of traditional, ethnic, homemade, and modern kites at Madonna University, Henry Ford Community College, and Dearborn Heights Library.

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S1430  Make-and-Take Spring Cards
Presenter:  Barbara Theurer
Date:  Friday, May 9
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 Noon
Fee:  Members $10, Nonmembers $15  (Fee includes $5 for materials.)
Class size:  Enrollment for this class is limited to 16 attendees.

Description:  Barbara's make-and-take papercraft class returns with a session devoted to Spring-themed cards.  At least one card will be of the "pop-up" genre.  We all have a creative side, so come to this class wearing your “creative hat.”  Class participants will go home with four completed cards to keep or to share with family and friends.  Barbara will bring all the materials you will need, along with instructions for each of the card designs covered in class. 

Barbara Theurer currently helps design, organize and teach projects for the monthly Papercraft Workshops at the Plymouth Public Library.  Barbara says: "Paper crafts give me a way both to express and to design with one of my favorite mediums.  It will be an honor to once again share something I truly enjoy with my Elderwise friends."

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LIFESTYLE, HEALTH & WELLNESS Back to top

S1401  T’ai Chi Ch’uan:  A Medieval Martial Art for Modern Times
Presenters:  Karla Groesbeck and Steve Harrigan
Dates:  Mondays, April 7 and 14
Time:  9:00 to 10:30 a.m. (Please note the 9:00 start time and 10:30 a.m. end time.)
Fee:  Members $10; Nonmembers $20
Class Size:  Enrollment for this class is limited to 30 attendees.

Description: T’ai Chi Ch’uan, or T’ai Chi, is a great way to relax and have fun, which are essential cravings of our modern lifestyles.  The origins of T’ai Chi are shrouded in myth and legend, but seem to have appeared first as a martial art in 13th century China.  Today it is recognized as a “soft” martial art, emphasizing a sequence of slow, rhythmic movements practiced by people of all ages and backgrounds.  Studies have proven that T’ai Chi improves balance, strength, health, and memory for every body type and group, especially older adults.  In this course, Karla and Steve will introduce the rich history of the art with interesting stories and components of this unique body, mind, and spirit activity.  They will also share a simple “form” based on the five traditional Chinese elements:  Fire, Water, Earth, Wood/Wind, and Metal.  Everyone who attends this class will have an opportunity to come away with a deeper and more appreciative understanding of the multi-dimensional nature of this intriguing and beneficial art/exercise. 

Karla Groesbeck has “played” at T’ai Chi for more than 15 years.  Her teacher is Steve Harrigan.  Karla is the owner of Good EnerChi Studio (www.GoodEnerChiStudio.com) in Ann Arbor and the instructor for many senior emeritus T”ai Chi classes at Washtenaw Community College (WCC) and the Meri Lou Murray Washtenaw County Recreation Center. 

Steve Harrigan has been teaching Yang Family style T’ai Chi Ch’uan in the Ann Arbor area for more than 30 years and has conducted classes at WCC, the Ann Arbor Y, and Eastern Michigan University.

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S1412  Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers
Presenter:  Mike Murray
Dates:  Fridays, May 30 and June 6
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $10; Nonmembers $20
Description: 

Robert Sapolsky is to stress, science, neuro-endocrinology, and primatology what Bruce Springsteen is to rock ‘n roll.
~Anonymous

Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers is authored by Stanford University biologist Robert Sapolsky and is based on his idea that for animals (such as zebras), stress is generally episodic, while for humans, stress is often chronic, and cumulative.  Wild animals are less susceptible to stress-related disorders such as ulcers, hypertension, clinical depression, and heart disease.  In this course Mike will explain exactly why too much stress will make you sick.  He will lead us through a detailed understanding of how stress affects our bodies as well as our psyches, combining lecture, discussion, videos, and handout material.  Professor Sapolsky’s book is recommended reading, but not required:  Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers, 3rd edition, Henry Holt and Company, LLC, 2004, paperback. 

Mike Murray is a licensed clinical psychologist and a specialist in the field of positive psychology.  He is also an expert on mindfulness and has studied and practiced Western and Eastern methods of meditation for over 50 years.

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S1420  Shopping Online and Buying Local:  Two Divergent Trends
Presenter:  Nicola Rooney
Date:  Monday, April 14
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  Shoppers nationwide are currently displaying two divergent behaviors.  Internet shopping is on the rise, but so is the Buy Local movement.  With striking examples from the book business, as well as from general retailing, Nicola Rooney will discuss the possible reasons why this is happening.  She will also explore the implications of these divergent trends for local businesses, for sales tax issues, and for broader environmental considerations, such as carbon footprints. 

Nicola Rooney was born in Germany after World War II while her father was serving in the British Army.  She attended boarding school and university in England, and was the first woman to graduate from Cambridge University in the field of chemical engineering.  Nicola worked in the chemical industry in England and Canada for 20 years before moving to Ann Arbor where, in 1995, she bought the book store (Nicola’s Books) she presently owns and manages.  She is also a gardener, a knitter, a cook, a grandmother and, of course, an avid reader of books.

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S1426  Keep it Simple:  Healthy Eating without the Fuss
Presenter:  Cecilia Sauter
Date:  Wednesday, April 30
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  Are you tired of spending many hours in the kitchen preparing a meal?  Are you looking for nutritious and easy meal ideas that fit into your budget?  Then this class is for you.  Come and learn about the different nutrients in foods, as well as what is considered a balanced meal.  Get ideas on how to cook great tasting meals that do not take a lot of time to prepare.  Eating out frequently?  Not a problem.  Learn how to find healthier foods on a menu without giving up the taste.  Many tips and ideas! 

Cecilia Sauter holds an M.S. degree from Texas Woman’s University and is a Registered Dietitian and a Certified Diabetes Educator.  She currently works at the University of Michigan, training clinical staff in how to help people who have chronic conditions, including diabetes.  Cecilia founded the Diabetes Education Program at the University of Michigan thirteen years ago, and has served on the Executive Board of the American Association of Diabetes Educators for more than seven years.

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S1437  Balancing Your Finances
Presenter:  Kathryn Greiner
Date:  Friday, May 30
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  If your goal is to relax about money and feel safe and secure that you are managing your resources well, this is the class for you.  In this workshop you will learn how to develop a plan for spending, bill-paying, and saving, so that as income comes in, you will know what money you can spend and enjoy, what must go for bills, and what to savings.  Our presenter, Kathryn Greiner, will provide budget forms and instructions.  You will also learn how to cut interest and accelerate debt reduction in a way that will improve your credit score. 

Kathryn Greiner is an Accredited Financial Counselor and the Director of Credit Education at the University of Michigan Credit Union.  With her unique blend of compassion, realism, and humor, Kathryn is known as the “Budget Guru” who, for more than 38 years, has been educating people and helping them find sensible, workable answers to their financial problems.

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LITERATURE, POETRY & DRAMA Back to top

S1403  Charles Dickens’ Nicholas Nickleby
Presenter:  George Stewart
Dates:  Fridays, April 11, 18, 25, and May 2
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $20; Nonmembers $40

Description:  Nicholas Nickleby is Dickens' third novel and one of his most exuberant.  On full display is the entire range of Dickensian hallmarks: memorable characters (including a contemptible villain, Wackford Squeers, and an endearing hero, Nicholas himself), multiple plots, humor, pathos, concern for the plight of children, and a satisfyingly happy ending.  For the first class session, please read the first 14 chapters, roughly one-quarter of the length of the book. 

George Stewart practiced law for many years in Kansas City, Chicago, Detroit, New York City, and Ann Arbor.  He is honing his retirement skills by reading (and re-reading) great writers like Dickens.  He looks forward to sharing the pleasures of Nicholas Nickleby with like-minded readers.

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S1404  Literature's Nobelist:  The Writings of Alice Munro
Presenter:  Cecilia Donohue
Dates:  Mondays, April 21 and 28
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $10; Nonmembers $20

Description:  Canadian-born Alice Munro, recipient of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Literature, focused, for purely pragmatic reasons, on one genre:  the short story.  This two-week session will provide an overview of her body of work over the past several decades, as class participants read and discuss Munro’s tales of rural and small-town life in her native country.  The text is Alice Munro’s Selected Stories, New York: Vintage Contemporaries, 1997; ISBN 0099732416.  This edition also is available as an e-book.  Please read the following stories for class discussion:

April 21
“Walker Brothers Cowboy,” “Dance of the Happy Shades,” “Postcard,” “Images,” “Something I’ve Been Meaning to Tell You,” “Simon’s Luck”

April 28
“The Turkey Season,” “The Moons of Jupiter,” “The Progress of Love,” “Carried Away,” “The Albanian Virgin,” “A Wilderness Station”

Cecilia Donohue is a retired professor and chair of Language and Literature at Madonna University.  She is the author of Robert Penn Warren’s Novels: Feminine and Feminist Discourse, and the editor of an anthology of essays on Sandra Cisneros’ Woman Hollering Creek.  Cecilia currently serves on the Editorial Board of the Steinbeck Review.

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S1405  Best-Seller Book Club
Facilitator:  Shirley Southgate
Dates:  Mondays, April 21, May 19, and June 16
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $15; Nonmembers $30
Description:  Using prepared questions and our own observations, the discussion each month will explore a book from the “best-seller” list.  Selected books for the Spring Term are:

April 21
Adriana Trigani, The Shoemaker’s Wife

May 19
Caroline Moorehead, A Train in Winter

June 16
Marcus Zusak, The Book Thief

Please read Adriana Trigani’s book The Shoemaker’s Wife before the first class.  A list of discussion questions for the selected book will be sent prior to each session.

Shirley Southgate will be joined by Karin Fenz and Betty Mogensen in facilitating the class discussions.  All three are long-time members of Elderwise and the Best-Seller Book Club, and enjoy sharing their thoughts about contemporary literature with others.

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S1411  William Faulkner:  Intruder in the Dust
Presenter:  Kevin Eyster
Dates:  Wednesdays, May 14 and 21
Time:  1:00 to 4:00 p.m.  (Please note the 4:00 p.m. end time.)
Fee:  Members $10; Nonmembers $20

Description:  Published in 1948 and adapted to film by MGM in 1949, Intruder in the Dust is William Faulkner’s fourteenth novel.  It centers on the African American character Lucas Beauchamp, who is accused of murdering Vinson Gowrie, a white Southerner.  To save Lucas from being lynched, the adolescent Charles “Chick” Mallison must solve the crime.  The post-World War II setting of the novel resonates in the film adaptation, shot on location in Oxford, Mississippi.  Our first class session will focus on the novel, and the second on the film adaptation, which we will view during the second session.  A paperback edition of the novel (Vintage Books, ISBN 0679736514) is available at local libraries and bookstores.  New and used copies are also available at a reasonable price through several online book dealers. 

Kevin Eyster is a professor and Chair of the Department of Language and Literature at Madonna University.  He teaches courses in critical writing and literary analysis, American folklore and literature, African American literature, and a Special Topics offering on the fiction of William Faulkner and Toni Morrison.

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S1415  American Poets Laureate, Part II
Presenter:  Leonore Gerstein
Dates:  Tuesdays, June 10, 17, and 24
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $15; Nonmembers $30

Description:  Picking up where we left off in the Winter Term, we continue our survey of selected Poets Laureate of the United States.  This time our poets will have crafted and published their work from 1970 to the present.  The facilitator will strive for a balance of well-known and lesser-known poets.  The text is “The Poets Laureate Anthology,” edited by Elizabeth Hun Schmidt (New York, W.W. Norton & Co., 2010; ISBN 978-0-393-06181-9). The hardcover edition can be found at local libraries and bookstores, and gently used copies are available through several online booksellers.  Course packs will be provided upon request for those who are unable to purchase the book. 

Leonore Gerstein moved from Massachusetts to a kibbutz in Israel at age ten.  She completed her B.A. degree in philosophy and English Literature at Jerusalem’s Hebrew University and returned to the United States in 1964.  In 1976 she earned an M.A. degree in speech and language pathology, and in 2003, her M.A. degree in English Literature from Eastern Michigan University.  Leonore believes that reading poems collectively is a “natural.”  We listen to and learn from one another.

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S1431  Shakespeare:  Playwright and Poet
Presenter:  Jeffrey Cordell
Date:  Monday, May 12
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  Shakespeare’s most famous lovers may be Romeo and Juliet, but his most sophisticated lovers are embedded (so to speak) in two other works – the play Antony and Cleopatra and the sonnets.  Unlike Romeo and Juliet, the lovers of Antony and Cleopatra and the sonnets are acquainted with the ins and outs of deception, and with the conflicting demands of career-life versus love-life.  In this class we will discuss the play, along with a selection of the sonnets, with an eye on Shakespeare’s use of form and genre to portray the complexities of politics, honor, truthfulness, sex, and any number of other impediments to the course of true love.  Participants are encouraged to read Antony and Cleopatra in advance and to bring a copy to class.  The Pelican paperback edition (ISBN 0-14-071452-9) is inexpensive and readily available.  The instructor will distribute copies of the selected sonnets prior to the class.

Jeffrey Cordell holds a Ph.D. in Renaissance literature from the University of Virginia.  He has taught literature and academic writing at Boston University, Harvard, and Alma College.  Jeffrey is presently an assistant professor in the Department of Language and Literature at Madonna University.

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S1408  Ludwig van Beethoven:  The Man and His Music
Presenter:  Jeanette Coviak
Dates:  Tuesdays, April 29 and May 6, 13, 20, and 27
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $25; Nonmembers $50

Description:  One of the most famous and influential of all composers, Ludwig van Beethoven was a crucial figure in the transition between the classical and the romantic eras in Western art music (our classical music tradition).  In this five-session course we will explore both the man and his music.  The course will feature videos from The Teaching Company, narrated by Professor Robert Greenberg, and the film In Search of Beethoven (Seventh Art Productions, 2009, 2011) by the award-winning filmmaker Phil Grabsky. 

Jeanette Coviak is a long-time Elderwise member and currently serves asChair of Elderwise Council.  She is a former piano teacher and says that, although she is not an “expert,” she has a deep love for all kinds of music.

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S1424  Clarinet Marmalade:  The Jazz Clarinet Revival
Presenter:  Nikolas Thompson
Date:  Thursday, April 24
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  The clarinet has been a preeminent and pioneering instrument in American jazz.  The instrument has been integral from New Orleans to Chicago, and from the sounds of Dixieland to that of the Big Bands.  Its rise to prominence likely peaked in the 1960s.  After a “short” hiatus (relative to the history of the genre), the clarinet is experiencing a wide-ranging resurgence in today’s popular modern jazz scene.  Join us in this class for a journey across 100 years of jazz musical history, with the clarinet as a constant, and with Sidney Bechet, Johnny Dodds, Woody Herman, Don Byron, and Anat Cohen, among others, as our guides. 

Nik Thompson is a life-long lover of all kinds of music.  His eclectic tastes are evident in the music he selects as host of WEMU’s 89.1 FM jazz program, Sunday Best.  Nik tells us, however, that he returns to jazz again and again for inspiration.  He has been hosting jazz, blues, and roots music programs at WEMU since 1999.  While Nik’s college degree is in literature and history, and he spends his work days in the field of finance, music retains a place of central importance in his life.

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S1425  Woody Guthrie:  An American Original
Presenter:  Michael Homel
Date:  Wednesday, April 30
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  Most of us know "This Land Is Your Land," "So Long, It's Been Good to Know You," and other familiar Woody Guthrie songs.  In this class we will learn about the extraordinary life story of an unusual man who, during a too-brief career, wrote thousands of songs – from Dust Bowl ballads to political protests to lyrics and music for children.  Woody Guthrie opened the way to the folk music revival of the late 1950s and 1960s, inspired Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen, and was a model for cultural rebels of the 1960s and 1970s.  In this class we will hear many recordings of Guthrie performing his songs. 

Michael Homel is a Professor Emeritus of History at Eastern Michigan University.  Mike specializes in 20th century U.S. history and U.S. urban history.  He is the author of Down from Equality: Black Chicagoans and the Public Schools, and Unlocking City Hall: Exploring the History of Local Government and Politics, and other publications on urban politics and education.

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S1435  Music of the Civil Rights Movement
Presenter:  Michael Homel
Date:  Wednesday, May 28
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  Group song played a key role in the southern black civil rights movement of the 1960s.  In this class we will explore the origins of civil rights music, and discuss the ways in which it bolstered nonviolent direct action campaigns for integration and equality.  Presenter Mike Homel will outline the major civil rights episodes of the era.  We will hear recordings both by civil rights participants and by performers who were not a part of the movement, yet nevertheless promoted its aims. 

Michael Homel is a Professor Emeritus of History at Eastern Michigan University.  Mike specializes in 20th century U.S. history and U.S. urban history.  He is the author of Down from Equality: Black Chicagoans and the Public Schools, and Unlocking City Hall: Exploring the History of Local Government and Politics, and other publications on urban politics and education.

Register 

 

NATURE & ENVIRONMENT Back to top

S1406  Climate Change Knowledge:  A Battle of Outlines versus Details
Presenter:  Brent Lofgren
Dates:  Thursdays, April 24 and May 1
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $10; Nonmembers $20

Description:  How might climate change affect people in particular regions?  Our scientific understanding is now well established  --  increased greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide have begun, and will continue, to warm the global climate.  However, there is a range of values within which this warming might fall, and the range of uncertainty increases when we ask about specific regions, such as the Great Lakes, and the ways that global warming might affect factors such as water levels, risk of disease, and natural ecosystems.  In this course we will take a quick tour of the basic understanding of climate change, potential strategies for preventing and adapting to climate change, the things that influence our perception of climate change science, and how the current political debate relates to that science. 

Brent Lofgren is a physical scientist at the Great Lakes Environmental Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Ann Arbor, Michigan.  Brent holds a bachelor’s degree in physics from Augsburg College and a Ph.D. in atmospheric and oceanic sciences from Princeton University.  He is the author of many peer-reviewed articles related to climate change and the Great Lakes.

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S1422  Adventure in Costa Rica
Presenters:  Judy and Frank Wilhelme
Date:  Wednesday, April 16
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  Our intrepid travelers, Judy and Frank Wilhelme, participated in a Road Scholars tour of Costa Rica in January 2013.  They found that this very special place more than lived up to its advance billing.  Unlike most Central American countries, Costa Rica has preserved an amazing variety of tropical ecosystems.  As a result, in a country the size of Lower Michigan, the Wilhelmes experienced much of what constitutes the tropics – rain forests, volcanoes, ocean beaches, hundreds of varieties of birds, monkeys, alligators, anteaters, and many more.  Oh . . . we almost forgot the flowers.  Simply amazing.  Join the Wilhelmes here for what promises to be an exciting and engaging Costa Rican adventure. 

Judy Wilhelme holds a master’s degree in library science from the University of Michigan, where she served as the University’s serial and electronic resources librarian from 1969 to 2009.  Judy currently volunteers for the Ann Arbor District Library, and sings with the Ann Arbor Civic Chorus. 

Frank Wilhelme graduated from Eastern Michigan University with degrees in history and served as the Executive Director of the Historical Society of Michigan from 1971 to 1980.  He then joined the business school’s development staff at the University of Michigan, retiring as assistant dean in 2009.  In retirement, both Judy and Frank enjoy traveling across the United States and abroad.

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S1440  Ladies and Gentlemen:  Gender Distinctions among Birds, Beasts, Bugs, and Bushes
Presenter:  Don Chalfant
Date:  Thursday, June 5
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10
Description:  Yes, we can all tell the difference betwen male and female cardinals, but what about robins, monarch butterflies, or bullfrogs?  In this photographic presentation, Don Chalfant will reveal the gender differences most often seen only by the members of the species and not by us.  We will study a variety of birds, mammals, plants, and insects in our search for clues to their gender differences.  So, let’s take a look at those differences the way they do.  After all, it is Spring! 

Don Chalfant received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Michigan.  He retired from the Ann Arbor Public Schools in 1995, where he taught elementary students for many years.  In retirement, Don indulges his passion for the outdoors, recently adding photography to his list of enthusiastic pursuits.

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S1443  A Walk in the Woods
Presenter:  Charles Olson
Date:  Tuesday, April 15
Rain Date:  Tuesday, April 22
Time:  1:00 to 4:00 p.m.  (Please note the 4:00 p.m. end time.)
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  Saginaw Forest is the woods in which you will walk.  The forest was a working farm when it was gifted in 1903 to the University of Michigan by timberman and University Regent Arthur Hill and his wife, Louise, both of whom came from Saginaw, Michigan.  The Hills wanted to “determine what species of trees can be used to reforest the worn-out farm lands of Michigan.”  Today, Saginaw Forest (located  on the western edge of Ann Arbor) is a field research area for University faculty and students engaged in studies of forest and sustainable ecosystem management.  This Elderwise class will involve a one-mile walk over dirt roads.  Please wear appropriate field-trip attire and sturdy walking shoes.  Driving directions to Saginaw Forest will be provided with your registration confirmation. 

Charles Olson retired from the University of Michigan faculty in 1999 after 35 years with the School of Natural Resources and Environment.  He is an emeritus professor and a forester who taught forest management and forest fire ecology at both the University of Illinois and the University of Michigan.  He is currently a Registered Forester in the State of Michigan.

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POLITICS, POLICY, LAW & CURRENT AFFAIRS Back to top

S1406  Climate Change Knowledge:  A Battle of Outlines versus Details
Presenter:  Brent Lofgren
Dates:  Thursdays, April 24 and May 1
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $10; Nonmembers $20

Description:  How might climate change affect people in particular regions?  Our scientific understanding is now well established  --  increased greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide have begun, and will continue, to warm the global climate.  However, there is a range of values within which this warming might fall, and the range of uncertainty increases when we ask about specific regions, such as the Great Lakes, and the ways that global warming might affect factors such as water levels, risk of disease, and natural ecosystems.  In this course we will take a quick tour of the basic understanding of climate change, potential strategies for preventing and adapting to climate change, the things that influence our perception of climate change science, and how the current political debate relates to that science. 

Brent Lofgren is a physical scientist at the Great Lakes Environmental Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Ann Arbor, Michigan.  Brent holds a bachelor’s degree in physics from Augsburg College and a Ph.D. in atmospheric and oceanic sciences from Princeton University.  He is the author of many peer-reviewed articles related to climate change and the Great Lakes.

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S1409  Taking Apart the News
Presenter:  Al Chambers
Dates:  Thursdays, May 8, 15, 22, and 29
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $20; Nonmembers $40

Description:   As participants in previous sessions of this class are aware, the content and discussion focus on the news of the week.  The Fall sessions were heavily headline driven; the top stories were easily identified, and remained controversial and unresolved throughout the four weeks.  The same could happen in May – or, there could be surprises with both already-known stories or unexpected news.  Presenter Al Chambers always hopes there is time to consider stories that he calls “Page 16.”  These are situations already brewing on the web or perhaps in other countries, but which are not yet leading the cable news shows or dominating other mainstream media. 

Al Chambers has a special ability to guide and encourage class participation.  This is based on his years of experience in wire service and broadcast journalism, his time as an executive in Communications at Ford Motor Company, and more recently his consulting with major companies about media exposure and reputation. Al welcomes new participants.

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S1410  Great Decisions
Presenter:  Joan Clauss
Dates:  Wednesdays, May 14, 21, and 28
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon
Fee:  Members $15; Nonmembers $30
Book of Readings:  $20.  Please note that the text for this class is the Foreign Policy booklet Great
Decisions 2014, Chapters 1, 2, and 7, available for purchase from the Elderwise office.

Description:  This discussion group focuses on international policy issues, and features video presentations and readings on topics selected by the nonpartisan Foreign Policy Association.  The Great Decisions briefing book features impartial, thought-provoking analyses on issues of concern to United States policymakers.  Each article, written by carefully selected experts, offers questions and tools for discussion, plus suggested policy options for U.S. officials.  During Spring Term 2014 we will cover the following topics:

May 14
Defense Technology by P. W. Singer
Our military engagements in the Middle East reveal an emerging priority of improvised combat for dispersed enemy forces.  At the same time, we continue to invest in conventional programs more suitable for fighting large unified enemy forces.  How can we balance our strategic policies between these two priorities?  How well have these priorities adjusted to changing military technology?  
May 21
Israel and the U. S. by Seth Aniziska
Israel has grown as a democratic government, but it has also pursued settlement expansion programs and the construction of the West Bank wall. Do such policies and actions curtail Israel’s democratic potential?  How has the Arab Spring impacted United States relations with Israel? 
May 28
China’s Foreign Policy by David M. Lampton
With new leadership in China, to what degree has the character of Chinese foreign policy changed toward more “assertiveness?”  Are China and the United States engaged in an arms race?  How do Chinese leaders and citizens assess their own strength?  What are the implications of these assessments?

Joan Clauss is a long-time member of Elderwise.  She earned her bachelor’s degree at Madonna University where a class on “Third World Countries” contributed to an interest in America’s foreign policy and world affairs.  Joan is retired from the University of Michigan College of Engineering where she was a director of the Cooperative Education Program.  She is currently an instructor for the Ann Arbor Public Schools Recreation and Education Adapted Program.

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S1433  Reinventing the Republican Party
Presenter:  Jeffrey Bernstein
Date:  Friday, May 16
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  The Republican Party has now lost the popular vote in five of the last six presidential elections, most recently in 2012.  That election, which appeared quite “winnable” for the Republicans, has sparked several serious questions.  Why are Republicans losing at the national level?  Is it the quality of the candidates, or the quality of the campaigns, or the issue positions they are taking?  Join us as we discuss how the Republicans might be able to reinvent themselves for 2014, 2016, and beyond. 

Jeffrey Bernstein studies and teaches political science and American politics at Eastern Michigan University.  His research interests include public opinion and political behavior, citizen education, and the scholarship of teaching and learning.  Jeff is contributing author and co-editor of Citizenship Across the Curriculum (Indiana University Press, 2010) and is currently working on a book-length study that explores political cognition processes and their implications for teaching political science.

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S1434  Shifting Science and Actual Innocence: An Update from the Michigan Innocence Clinic
Presenter:  David Moran
Date:  Thursday, May 22
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  The Michigan Innocence Clinic investigates and litigates claims of innocence by convicted prisoners in cases where DNA evidence is not available.  Founded in 2009 within the University of Michigan Law School, by Professors David Moran and Bridget McCormack, the Clinic’s work has to date exonerated five men and two women with combined wrongful incarcerations of more than 80 years.  In this class Professor Moran will address the phenomenon of wrongful conviction, and will focus on the specific problem of persons who were convicted years ago based on scientific or forensic testimony that has since been called into question by newer science and forensics.  He will discuss several of the Clinic's cases involving arson and shaken baby syndrome to illustrate the problem. 

David Moran is co-director of the Michigan Innocence Clinic.  He earned his J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Michigan Law School.  Before joining the Michigan law faculty in 2008, he taught law and served as Dean of Academic Affairs at Wayne State University.  In 2010, Professors Moran and McCormack jointly received the Justice For All Award, the highest award bestowed by the Criminal Defense Attorneys of Michigan.

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S1436 Mandatory Sentencing for Juveniles
Presenter: Kimberly Thomas
Date: Thursday, May 29
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee: Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description: In this class Professor Kimberly Thomas will discuss the sentencing of young people under 18 years of age to life without parole. Professor Thomas is a co-founder, with Frank Vandervort, of the University of Michigan Law School’s Juvenile Justice Clinic, which represents individuals serving life without parole for offenses committed when they were minors. Recently, the United States Supreme Court found that it was unconstitutional to impose on teenagers a mandatory sentence of life without parole. Yet the high court left many unanswered questions. This spring, the Michigan Supreme Court will take up the issues surrounding the maximum sentence that can be given to juveniles. Professor Thomas will help to provide an understanding of the constitutional and practical implications of this issue at both the state and national levels.

Kimberly Thomas teaches at the University of Michigan Law School, with a focus on clinical teaching related to criminal and juvenile law. She earned her J.D., magna cum laude, from Harvard Law School. Prior to coming to the University of Michigan in 2003, Kimberly served as a major trial attorney with the Defender Association of Philadelphia.

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SCIENCE & MATHEMATICS Back to top

S1406  Climate Change Knowledge:  A Battle of Outlines versus Details
Presenter:  Brent Lofgren
Dates:  Thursdays, April 24 and May 1
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $10; Nonmembers $20

Description:  How might climate change affect people in particular regions?  Our scientific understanding is now well established  --  increased greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide have begun, and will continue, to warm the global climate.  However, there is a range of values within which this warming might fall, and the range of uncertainty increases when we ask about specific regions, such as the Great Lakes, and the ways that global warming might affect factors such as water levels, risk of disease, and natural ecosystems.  In this course we will take a quick tour of the basic understanding of climate change, potential strategies for preventing and adapting to climate change, the things that influence our perception of climate change science, and how the current political debate relates to that science. 

Brent Lofgren is a physical scientist at the Great Lakes Environmental Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Ann Arbor, Michigan.  Brent holds a bachelor’s degree in physics from Augsburg College and a Ph.D. in atmospheric and oceanic sciences from Princeton University.  He is the author of many peer-reviewed articles related to climate change and the Great Lakes.

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S1413  Aliens?  The Science Behind Searching for Extraterrestrial Life
Presenter:  Eric Bell
Dates:  Mondays, June 2, 9, and 16
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $15; Nonmembers $30

Description:  In this class we will discuss the ongoing search for extraterrestrial life, placing a strong focus on the scientific hurdles that impede our understanding of the development of life, and the potential evolution of this search toward interstellar travel and communication.  The framework of our course will be based on the famous question about extraterrestrial life posed by renowned physicist Enrico Fermi:  “Where are they?”  After establishing how powerful this question is as a framework for thinking about extraterrestrial life, we will explore different possible solutions to a seeming paradox.  Perhaps there are no other planets on which life can develop?  We will survey the exciting search for “extra-solar” planets and their biological potential.  Maybe life never does develop?  We will explore the evolution of life on Earth to illustrate potentially common features of life’s development elsewhere in the Universe.  Maybe it is too difficult to travel and communicate in that Universe?  We will also discuss the challenges for communication and contact with extraterrestrial life. 

Eric Bell is an associate professor of astronomy at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and director of the Michigan Institute for Research in Astrophysics.   He received his B.Sc. (Hons) in physics and astronomy from the University of Glasgow and his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Durham.

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S1414  Science, Art, and Spirituality
Presenter:  Michael R. Kapetan
Dates:  Mondays, June 9 and 23
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $10; Nonmembers $20

Description:  Doing science, creating art, and practicing spirituality constitute three of mankind’s greatest and most long-lived enterprises.  The boundaries of each of these fundamental human activities remain exquisitely elastic.  We combine them in very different ways in different times and places.  As they run parallel, interweave, intersect – even collide – and touch on the slightest tangents, they fashion and refashion the farthest frontiers of our imagination.  Without science, art becomes hollow.  Without art, science becomes hopeless.  Without spirituality, neither can have lasting value.  Together, they can become the basis for wisdom.  This course will examine the interplay of the three at pivotal times in human history:  the ancient Stone Age, the era of classical Greece, the Renaissance, the dawn of the modern industrial world, and the present day. 

Michael R. Kapetan is an artist whose own work is informed by the scientific, the aesthetic, and the spiritual as he creates holy images for churches and synagogues, and unique solar sculptures that mark the turning of the seasons.  Mike is retired from the University of Michigan where he taught for more than 20 years in the School of Art and Design and the Department of History of Art.  He currently resides in Ann Arbor where he practices his art and his craft in a home studio.

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S1427  Zero to Infinity:  A History of Numbers
Presenter:  Chris Hee
Date:  Thursday, May 1
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  One, two, buckle my shoe.  Three, four . . . We learn our numbers at an early age, but we rarely consider the when and where of how they came to be.  In this class we will begin by discussing the development of systems of Numeration.  We will journey back in time to the numeral systems of ancient Babylonia, and those developed by the Egyptians and the Romans.  Our journey will bring us to the significance of a numeral for zero, as devised by the Arabs and the scholars of India, and separately by the Mayan people of the Western hemisphere.  We will then look at the mathematical development of the careful definition of numbers, including integers, rational numbers (fractions), real numbers, and complex numbers.  Finally, we will discover that there are an infinite number of infinities.  

Chris Hee is a Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at Eastern Michigan University.  He has taught several classes at Elderwise, including Calculus Made Accessible, A Tale of Discovery in Math, Sudoku, Fun with Puzzles, and Cryptic Crosswords.

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S1445  The Unique Geology and Fossils of the Michigan Basin
Presenter and Guide:  David Thompson
Dates:  Thursdays, June 12, 19, and 26  (Please note June 26 is a museum visit.)
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $15; Nonmembers $30

Description:  This course includes two classes at Cleary University on June 12 and 19, and a field trip to the University of Michigan Museum of Natural History on June 26.  We will focus on Michigan’s geology and the fossils of the Michigan Basin.  Dave Thompson will discuss basic geological formations, eras of geological time, and the origins of specific fossils.  He will provide examples of fossils in both images and actual forms, and will identify and describe fossil locations and unique attributes.  We will not be discussing dinosaurs – there were none in Michigan – but Dave will explain the “why” of that.  Class members are encouraged to bring their own fossil “finds” for identification.  Dave will also guide the tour of the fossil exhibits at the Museum of Natural History.  There is no charge for this tour, but donations are always welcome.  Driving directions and parking information will be sent with your registration confirmation. 

Dave Thompson has been collecting and studying fossils since childhood.  He is an expert on Michigan Basin invertebrate fossils, and is a Friend of the University of Michigan Museum of Paleontology.  Dave has been a guest paleontologist at the Natural History Museum, and more than 200 of his photos are displayed on a website jointly sponsored by the University of Michigan and the University of Wisconsin.

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THEATER PRODUCTIONS & CLASSES Back to top

S1448  Working on Tennessee Williams
Presenter:  Kate Mendeloff, Director

Dates/Times/Location: Pre-Performance Class: Thursday April 10, 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. at Cleary University
  Evening Performances : Friday April 11, and Saturday April 12, 7:00 p.m. at the Matthaei Botanical Gardens Conservatory
  Post-Performance Class :   Thursday, April 17, 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. at Cleary University

Fee: Members $10; Nonmembers $20
Please Note:  There is no admission fee for the play, but there is a charge for parking at the Matthaei Botanical Gardens.
Class Size: Each performance of the play at the Matthaei Conservatory is limited to ten Elderwise attendees.  When you register for the classes and the play, please indicate which performance (April 11 or April 12) you plan to attend.  There is no enrollment limit for the pre- and post-performance classes at Cleary.

Description:  Drama lecturer and director Kate Mendeloff will present staging ideas for her Tennessee Williams production set in the Matthaei Botanical Gardens Conservatory.  She will describe her rehearsal process and discuss the play’s text from a production perspective.  The first class session on April 10 will introduce the play and its production.  The second session on April 17 provides an opportunity for reflection and discussion about the actual performance.  As we go to press with this catalog, the plays being considered are Clothes for a Summer Hotel, about Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald, Night of the Iguana, and Orpheus Descending.  The selected play will be announced in early March. 

Kate Mendeloff, a graduate of Princeton University and the Yale School of Drama, has been on the faculty of the Residential College at the University of Michigan since 1990.  She initiated, and is the director of, Shakespeare in the Arb, now in its fourteenth season.  Kate is also an artistic associate of the Provincetown Tennessee Williams Festival, and has directed three productions for them since 2007.

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S1449 PTD Productions:  Fallen Angels A Comedy by Noël Coward; Directed by Liz Greaves Hoxie
Presenter:  Laura C. Bird

Dates/Times/Location:

Pre-Performance Class: Wednesday, June 11, 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. at Riverside Theater, Ypsilanti

 

Matinee Performance: Wednesday, June 18, 2:00 p.m. at the Riverside Theater, Ypsilanti

 

Evening Performance: Saturday, June 21, 8:00 p.m. at the Riverside Theater, Ypsilanti

 

Post-Performance Class: Wednesday, June 25, 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. at Cleary University

Fees:   Members $21; Nonmembers $31
(Please Note: The fee includes one ticket to the play for either the June 18 Matinee or the June 21 evening performance.)
Extra tickets are $11 each.  Please see S1451 on this catalog’s Registration Form.

Description:  Fallen Angels is the comedic story of Julia and Jane, two upper-class women living in England in the early 1900s.  They are best friends, and happily married to Fred and Willy, who are away on a golf trip.  As they sip their cocktails, Julia and Jane come to realize, with horror, that they are both waiting for an illicit assignation with the same man.  Enter Maurice, a charming, handsome Frenchman, with whom they both had a brief and torrid pre-marital affair.  Noël Coward is at his inimitable best in delivering this comedy of manners among “upper crust” society in early 20th century England. 

Laura C. Bird earned her master’s degree in theater from Eastern Michigan University and her doctorate in theater history from Michigan State University.  For many years she was the one-person theater department at Concordia University in Ann Arbor.  Laura has taught theater history, directing, and technical theater in Michigan and Pennsylvania.  Currently, she is a member of the theater faculty at Greenhills School in Ann Arbor.

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S1450  Eastern Michigan University (EMU) Theater:  Sylvia A Comedy by A.R. Gurney; Directed by Ken Stevens
Presenter:  Ken Stevens

Dates/Times/Location:

Pre-Performance Class:Thursday, June 12, 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon at Cleary University

 

Matinee Performance: Sunday, June 15, 2:00 p.m. at EMU Sponberg Theater

 

Post-Performance Class: Thursday, June 19, 10:00 a.m. to 12 noon at Cleary University

Fees:   Members $19; Nonmembers $29 (Fee includes one ticket to the play.)
Emeritus Faculty:  Members $10; Nonmembers $20 (Fee includes two tickets to the play.)
Extra tickets are $9 each. Please see S1452 on this catalog’s Registration Form.

Description:  This funny but rather touching play revolves around empty-nesters Greg and Kate, following their move back to Manhattan after 22 years of child-raising in the suburbs.  Greg brings home Sylvia, a stray, street-smart dog he found in the park.  Unfortunately, Sylvia becomes a source of contention.  Sylvia offers Greg an escape from the frustrations of life, work, and the onset of middle age.  For Kate, Sylvia is just an annoying rival for Greg’s affection.  The marriage is in jeopardy, until a series of hilarious and poignant complications teach Greg and Kate how to compromise.  A.R. Gurney’s Sylvia premiered at the Manhattan
Theater Club in 1995, and received Drama Desk Award nominations for Outstanding Play, Outstanding Actress in a Play (Sarah Jessica Parker), and Outstanding Costume Design.

Ken Stevens came to Eastern Michigan University (EMU) from Cincinnati, Ohio, where he co-founded the Showboat Majestic Theater and served as a Rockefeller Fellow at the Playhouse in the Park and the University of Cincinnati.  Professor Stevens created EMU's graduate and undergraduate programs in arts management, for which he now serves as advisor.  He has directed over one hundred musicals and plays for EMU and for stock and regional theaters.

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TOURS (Local) Back to top

S1442  Japan's Floating World:  The Art of Ukiyo-e
Presenter and Guide:  Diane Rado
Date:  Friday, April 11 at the University of Michigan Museum of Art
Time:  3:00 to 4:00 p.m.  (Please note the 3:00 p.m. start time.)
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10
Class Size:  Enrollment for this class is limited to 10 attendees.

Description:  The first ukiyo-e paintings and woodblock prints “of the evanescent, floating world” appeared in Edo (present day Tokyo) in 17th century Japan.  They portrayed the world of Yoshiwara hedonism, fashion, and style.  The Yoshiwara district was a city within the city, a warren of bachelors on the loose, pleasures of the moon, cherry blossoms, Kabuki theater, and cross-dressing actors.  The art of ukiyo-e captured these images, as well as those of the courtesan, the prostitute and, later, the girl-next-door with mask-like face, on parade or in brothels.  On this tour we will examine the historical background of the emergence of the Yoshiwara district and its unique art forms.  Presenter and guide Diane Rado will explain the process of creating the woodblock prints of hanging and horizontal scrolls, and pillar painting.  We will also see items such as kimono and obi, samurai accessories, and tea ceremony implements, all found in the renowned collection of Asian art at the University of Michigan Museum of Art.  Driving directions and parking instructions will be sent with your registration confirmation. 

Diane Rado received her bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees from the University of Michigan.  She has been a docent and tour guide at UMMA for 14 years, and says of her vocation, “We docents are always learning more and more from our curators and classes, from distinguished scholars in art history, and from the people who visit us!” 

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S1444  A Tour of St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, Ann Arbor
Presenter and Guide:  Father Nicolaos H. Kotsis
Date:  Friday, June 6, at St. Nicholas on Scio Church Road, Ann Arbor
Time:  10:00 to 11:00 a.m.  (Please note the 11:00 a.m. end time.)
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  At the turn of the 21st century, Ann Arbor’s Greek Orthodox congregation moved from their last downtown site on North Main Street to the newly constructed and dedicated Saint Nicholas Church on Scio Church Road, a magnificent edifice in the classic Greek Orthodox style.  When you join us for this visit, you are in for a special treat.  Father Nick, as he is fondly known, will offer you an engaging, informative, and in-depth tour, including background on the Greek Orthodox faith, the local parish, and the art and architecture of the church.  The architecture alone provides a wealth of information about the traditions and customs of the Orthodox religion and its buildings.  The art includes a carving of Saint Nicholas and a mosaic of the Annunciation by local sculptor and artist Michael Kapetan.  By the time of our tour, the first phase of interior iconography will be in place on the walls, ceilings, and arches surrounding the altar.  Our tour will conclude at the beginning of the church’s annual Greek Festival.  All tour participants are welcome to attend.  Driving directions and parking instructions will be sent with your registration confirmation. 

Father Nicolaos Kotsis is the Proistamanos (Priest) of Saint Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church in Ann Arbor.  He grew up in southeastern Michigan and holds a bachelor’s degree in history from the University of Michigan and a master’s degree in divinity from Holy Cross.  He was ordained to the Orthodox priesthood in 2004, and assigned to Saint Nicholas Church, Ann Arbor, in 2005.  Father Nick and his wife Alexandra live in Ann Arbor with their three children Harry, Vasiliki, and George.

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S1445  The Unique Geology and Fossils of the Michigan Basin
Presenter and Guide:  David Thompson
Dates:  Thursdays, June 12, 19, and 26  (Please note June 26 is a museum visit.)
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $15; Nonmembers $30

Description:  This course includes two classes at Cleary University on June 12 and 19, and a field trip to the University of Michigan Museum of Natural History on June 26.  We will focus on Michigan’s geology and the fossils of the Michigan Basin.  Dave Thompson will discuss basic geological formations, eras of geological time, and the origins of specific fossils.  He will provide examples of fossils in both images and actual forms, and will identify and describe fossil locations and unique attributes.  We will not be discussing dinosaurs – there were none in Michigan – but Dave will explain the “why” of that.  Class members are encouraged to bring their own fossil “finds” for identification.  Dave will also guide the tour of the fossil exhibits at the Museum of Natural History.  There is no charge for this tour, but donations are always welcome.  Driving directions and parking information will be sent with your registration confirmation.

Dave Thompson has been collecting and studying fossils since childhood.  He is an expert on Michigan Basin invertebrate fossils, and is a Friend of the University of Michigan Museum of Paleontology.  Dave has been a guest paleontologist at the Natural History Museum, and more than 200 of his photos are displayed on a website jointly sponsored by the University of Michigan and the University of Wisconsin.

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S1446   Happy Birthday Henry! A Tour of Henry Ford Historic Sites
Presenter and Guide:  Steve Stanford
Date:  Friday, June 13
Time:  8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.  (Please note this is an all-day tour.)
Fee:  Members $69; Nonmembers $74  (Fees include lunch at Maccabees at Midtown.**)
Tour Size:  This tour is limited to 46 participants, including spaces for two wheelchairs.

Description:  Join this narrated tour of Ford historic landmarks in Dearborn and Detroit, and celebrate the 150th birthday of legendary American industrialist, Henry Ford.  Henry’s Model T put the world on wheels, and he revolutionized factory work with the moving assembly line and the $5-a-day wage.  Our own Ford historian, Steve Stanford, will narrate and chronicle Henry Ford’s fascinating story as we tour sites in Dearborn and Detroit that were critical to his life and the evolution of the Ford Motor Company.  Hailed as a visionary and an innovator, Henry Ford was also a man of contradictions.  He embraced the future, but he also clung to the past.  As we visit several historic sites, Steve will share Henry’s triumphs and tragedies, while spellbinding us with revelations of the private man behind the public image.  This tour is offered by Bianco Tours & Transportation.  The motor coach departs from Cleary University parking lot at 8:00 a.m. and returns there at 5:00 p.m. on the day of the tour.  The tour package includes lunch at Maccabees at Midtown restaurant and a guided visit to the Ford Piquette Plant.  Detailed information is available at the Elderwise office, including a flyer where you can indicate your menu choice for lunch. 

Steve Stanford is a retired Oakland County Project Manager.  He has previously offered numerous presentations on Ford-related subjects for Elderwise.  Steve is a participant in the Henry Ford 150 project, celebrating Henry’s 150th birthday (2013).  Steve is also a member of the Henry Ford Heritage Association and the Society of Automotive Historians.

**Maccabees at Midtown - This new restaurant is located in the historic Maccabees Building designed by Henry Ford’s favorite architect Albert Kahn.  Built in 1927 as the headquarters of the fraternal organization Knights of the Maccabees, this neo-gothic highrise, with art deco influences, once housed the WXYZ radio and television studios where the first Lone Ranger radio show debuted in 1933.

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S1447  The Palace and the Pipe Organ:  A Tour of the Michigan Theater
Presenter and Guide:  Henry Aldridge
Date:  Wednesday, June 18
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  Eastern Michigan University (EMU) Film Studies professor and theater organist Henry Aldridge will lead a tour of Ann Arbor’s only remaining movie palace – the Michigan Theater.  The tour includes a short concert on the famous Barton pipe organ, a rare glimpse of the stage and projection booth, plus a short PowerPoint presentation on the history of Ann Arbor’s movie theaters.  Driving directions and parking instructions will be sent with your registration confirmation.  

Henry Aldridge was a leader in the restoration of the Michigan Theater’s pipe organ in 1970, and served as an incorporating officer of the Michigan Theater Foundation that saved the historic structure from demolition in 1979.  He has been playing the Barton pipe organ for 39 years, and has served as the Foundation’s president.  He has recently finished writing a book about the Michigan Theater.  Professor Aldridge is a member of the EMU Department of Communication, Media, and Theater Arts.  He holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from the University of North Carolina and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.

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TRAVELOGUES Back to top

S1422  Adventure in Costa Rica
Presenters:  Judy and Frank Wilhelme
Date:  Wednesday, April 16
Time:  1:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  Our intrepid travelers, Judy and Frank Wilhelme, participated in a Road Scholars tour of Costa Rica in January 2013.  They found that this very special place more than lived up to its advance billing.  Unlike most Central American countries, Costa Rica has preserved an amazing variety of tropical ecosystems.  As a result, in a country the size of Lower Michigan, the Wilhelmes experienced much of what constitutes the tropics – rain forests, volcanoes, ocean beaches, hundreds of varieties of birds, monkeys, alligators, anteaters, and many more.  Oh . . . we almost forgot the flowers.  Simply amazing.  Join the Wilhelmes here for what promises to be an exciting and engaging Costa Rican adventure. 

Judy Wilhelme holds a master’s degree in library science from the University of Michigan, where she served as the University’s serial and electronic resources librarian from 1969 to 2009.  Judy currently volunteers for the Ann Arbor District Library, and sings with the Ann Arbor Civic Chorus. 

Frank Wilhelme graduated from Eastern Michigan University with degrees in history and served as the Executive Director of the Historical Society of Michigan from 1971 to 1980.  He then joined the business school’s development staff at the University of Michigan, retiring as assistant dean in 2009.  In retirement, both Judy and Frank enjoy traveling across the United States and abroad.

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S1429  The Lighthouses of Portugal
Presenter:  Mary Borkowski
Date:  Thursday, May 8
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  In the fall of 2013, Mary Borkowski and her husband Phil traveled to Portugal with members of the United States Lighthouse Society to visit the lighthouses of Portugal, along with many of Portugal’s other attractions.  Join Mary here as she takes you on a journey along the coast of Portugal, starting at Vila Real de Santo António, at the southeast border with Spain, and travelling north to Montedor, near the northern Spanish border.  We will also visit Portugal’s biggest cities, Lisbon and Porto, as well as medieval walled hill towns.  For this journey we will travel on land and sea to view spectacular lighthouses and exquisite Portuguese countryside.  The lighthouses of Portugal include historic and picturesque lighthouse towers, one with a hyper-radial Fresnel lens. 

Mary Borkowski is a landscape architect who spent 40 years with Atwell-Hicks before retiring in 2005.  Mary and Phil have been traveling to and photographing scenic lighthouses worldwide for more than 30 years.  They often travel with the U.S. Lighthouse Society, and Mary is an activevolunteer with that group.

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S1441  A Journey through Japanese History
Presenters:  Russell and Lonnie Haines
Date:  Wednesday, June 11
Time:  10:00 a.m. to 12 noon
Fee:  Members $5; Nonmembers $10

Description:  A tour of Japan is really a journey through Japanese history.  This is what Russ and Lonnie Haines discovered on their recent visit.  Exquisite examples of Japan’s unique cultural heritage are everywhere to be seen, carefully preserved and protected by a people who treasure their past.  In this remarkable PowerPoint presentation, Russ and Lonnie will show us some of Tokyo’s treasures (Ueno Park, the Imperial Palace, Asakusa Temple, the Ginza, and the Tsukiji Fish Market).  Moving south, we will see the Great Buddha of Kamakura, Mt. Fuji in the distance, and Hakone, a favorite Japanese vacation spot.  In Kanazawa, north of the Sea of Japan, we will explore unique farm houses known as gassho zukuri or “praying hands.”  In Kyoto we will visit many gardens, temples, and shrines, and in Hiroshima, the Peace Park.  We will also delight in the unique beauty of Japan’s southern islands.  Russ and Lonnie will accompany their presentation with background on Japan’s political, military, and religious institutions, and important cultural dimensions such as social customs and etiquette, artistic traditions, and culinary tastes. 

Russell Haines received his master’s degree in education administration from the University of Michigan.  He found that he much preferred working with students and spent more than 30 years teaching in a variety of fields.  Russell’s primary classroom environment was the computer lab where he helped students learn new technological skills. 

Lonnie Haines received her undergraduate degree in mathematics and science from the University of Detroit Mercy and her master’s degree in the teaching of science from the University of Michigan.  Over the next 30 years, she enjoyed a successful career in teaching scientific subjects.  Lonnie is an accomplished artist in the genres of watercolor and acrylic painting.  Both Russ and Lonnie are retired and delight in traveling together to distant and exotic destinations around the world.

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